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Ad campaign targets 700 incidences of potentially fatal infections at Stanford Hospital

As part of a campaign by a branch of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), an advertisement criticizing the Stanford Health Care (SHC) system is currently being broadcast on radio stations across the Bay Area. The ad primarily discusses above-average rates of patient infection at Stanford Hospital, although the larger campaign also addresses working conditions at the Hospital.

Hundreds of Stanford and local high school students rally for gun control

In the wake of the Feb. 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School (MSD) in Parkland, Florida that left 17 students and faculty members dead, survivors of the shooting galvanized a national movement demanding gun reform. Exactly one month later, on Wednesday March 14, students at Stanford and in Palo Alto joined others around the country in a nationwide walkout for gun control.

Controversial Cardinal Conversations speaker Murray sparks peaceful anti-racist rally

Controversial social scientist Charles Murray and Freeman Spogli Institute senior fellow Francis Fukuyama discussed inequality and populism at the Hoover Institute on Thursday night in the second of four Cardinal Conversations, a program that aims to promote open political discourse on campus.

The event had visibly low attendance, with most of the back segment — around 100 seats — of the 400-person auditorium unfilled. Towards the front of the room, multiple reserved seats were left empty, as were several in the first row.

Meanwhile, across the street at the History Corner, “Take Back The Mic” counter-programming protested Murray and statements he has made regarding the relationship between class, race and intelligence.

Majority of audience stages walk out of Spencer’s talk

Reports of physical altercations from both supporters and opponents of a talk by self-proclaimed Islamophobe Robert Spencer surfaced following the Tuesday event. The auditorium of nearly 250 had every seat filled — with a line out the door — until approximately 150 students walked out of the event 20 minutes in, joining a larger group of protesters rallying outside the nearby Mitchell Earth Sciences library.