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In response to Trump’s proposed executive order

On Saturday, President Trump announced  his intention to issue an executive order requiring American universities to maintain “free speech” on their campuses and threatened to withdraw federal funding from noncompliant institutions. Practical considerations aside – it’s not clear how this plan would be enacted – Trump’s message should trouble Stanford students because of the ways it mischaracterizes the state of free speech at schools like our own. These mischaracterizations feed into a narrative that has the potential to stifle, rather than protect, free speech on Stanford’s campus.

Hoover must re-evaluate the academic merit of its fellows

Stanford is renowned for being the home of some of the world’s most brilliant minds, and these minds are undoubtedly one of this university’s greatest assets. As students here, we often witness firsthand the unrivaled intellectual caliber of our professors, and, less often but still occasionally, the difficulty of obtaining and keeping those professorial positions here. We also hear of cases where top-notch scholars don’t receive tenure, a fate shared by half of all the assistant professors here.

To Dinesh D’Souza’s detractors: Don’t give him new ammunition

Today the Stanford College Republicans will be hosting notorious documentarian, author, and political commentator Dinesh D’Souza at the CEMEX Auditorium. His ostensible speaking topic will be “Fighting Censorship and Debunking Fake History.” Of course, D’Souza is an eminent authority on the latter, seeing as how he has regularly peddled false historical narratives and conspiracy theories in…

Do conservatives belong at Stanford?

No one has ever doubted that the Hoover Institution, a think tank and research center named after Republican president Herbert Hoover, leans conservative. Its fellows have shaped American domestic and foreign policy under nearly every president for the past 50 years. Despite this prestigious service to our university and our country, several members of the faculty senate suddenly decided they had had enough of the sole conservative institution on campus. Professor Kenneth Taylor called the Hoover Institution’s conservative ideology “intellectually bankrupt.” In a published statement last Friday, over a dozen Stanford professors described Hoover’s commitment to its mission statement, as ‘constraining’ and “antithetical to the spirit of open inquiry that is a fundamental element of liberal education.”