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Rey Barceló
Rey Barceló is a sophomore studying Computer Science (and trying to pick up a Film minor along the way)! He hails from sunny SoCal, but spent far more time watching films than going to the beach. Happiest when immersed in the psychedelic sounds of Tame Impala, the invented worlds of Jorge Luis Borges, and the Criterion Collection, he can usually be found in the Media and Microtext Center of Green Library, in between Paul Thomas Anderson and Ingmar Bergman. He recommends "Hausu" (1977) for its gritty depiction of carnivorous-piano-related deaths and "Cemetery of Splendour" (2015) for its action-packed thrills.

‘The Green Fog’ is a dizzying Hitchcock homage

Alfred Hitchcock’s “Vertigo” is the ultimate re-watch movie. Film critics prescribe this movie like Tylenol: If you’re in love, see “Vertigo”; if you’re depressed, see “Vertigo”; if you just saw “Vertigo,” see “Vertigo” again. (Director and cinephile Chris Marker boasted that he’d seen the film 19 times.) And the critics have a point, mostly. “Vertigo” is…

Danny Boyle talks with The Daily on ‘T2 Trainspotting’

Danny Boyle is the director of “Trainspotting,” “28 Days Later,” “Steve Jobs” and “Slumdog Millionaire,” which garnered him an Academy Award for Best Director. For his latest film, “T2 Trainspotting” – which follows the cast of “Trainspotting” as they confront old rivalries, old vices and growing old – Boyle sat down with The Daily to talk friendship, drugs and…

‘T2 Trainspotting’ shows the dark side of choosing life

How do you spend a life you didn’t ask for? If you have an answer, please inform the characters in “T2 Trainspotting.” They’d really like to know. When we last saw these raucous Scots in the original “Trainspotting,” they knew they were living on borrowed time. It was 1996, and a combination of HIV/AIDS, heroin…

Flashback Friday: ‘Symbiopsychotaxiplasm’ is a film even stranger than it sounds

Welcome to Flashback Friday – for when you just can’t get enough of Throwback Thursday. This week, we are reviewing the bizarre, aggressively-meta 1968 comedy “Symbiopsychotaxiplasm,” playing at the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive as part of their multi-month-long event “Hippie Modernism: Cinema and Counterculture.” Our critic Rey Barcelo highly recommends you see it, if…

Throwback Thursday: ‘Blow Out’ is a knockout

Welcome to “Throwback Thursdays,” a new film feature at the Stanford Daily. Every Thursday (hopefully), the Arts & Life section will publish reviews highlighting older or more obscure works — sometimes both — that are currently not playing in traditional theaters. This week, we’ll be focusing on Brian De Palma’s 1981 cult classic “Blow Out,” which…

‘Toni Erdmann’ is as hilarious as it is horrifying

Germans aren’t generally known for their sense of humor. Understandably, the country that produced Nietzche, the Third Reich, and Krampus the Christmas demon is too concerned with the horrors of humanity to laugh at itself. When they dare to venture into comedic territory, the results tend toward bleak absurdism: The famous German satire “Even Dwarfs…

Rey Barcelo’s top five films of 2016

5. “Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World” At first glance, German eccentric and self-professed technophobe Werner Herzog may seem an inappropriate choice to direct a documentary about the internet. Yet Herzog’s inexperience is the film’s strongest asset, since he seeks out subjects that most filmmakers would ignore. Traveling from Stanford engineering labs to…

Jeff Nichols’ ‘Loving’ Is As Tender As It Is Timely

“We may lose the small battles but win the big war,” says Ruth Negga’s character in “Loving,” the latest film from American independent director Jeff Nichols. Could any quote possibly be more appropriate for our time? “Loving” recounts the true story of Richard and Mildred Loving, an interracial couple initially sentenced to prison in their…

Film review: ‘Tower’ finds humanity amidst tragedy

The reporting of mass shootings, like the coverage of sports scores or the weather forecast, has become a routine. With each new incident, we see an anxious reporter standing in front of a tangle of caution tape, illuminated by a chiaroscuro of flashing police lights. A stretcher is wheeled away in the background, and then several…
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