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Campus worker profile: Week six

The Campus Workers’ Rights Coalition and members of CSRE35SI: An Introduction to Labor Organizing have put together a series of profiles drawn from both archival and current interviews with workers on-campus to highlight both the struggles that workers at Stanford face and the resilience that they bring to the work they do. Campus workers often have to deal with chronic understaffing and difficult menial labor. Alongside this, Stanford does not pay its workers a living wage despite the rising costs of food, health, and housing in the Bay, and workers must often cover many of their own health costs because of a lack of insurance benefits while managing hours-long commutes due to a dearth of affordable housing.

Op-Ed: Israeli Court upholds deportation of clinic alumnus & Human Rights Watch director

On April 16 the District Court of Jerusalem upheld the deportation of Human Rights Watch Director for Israel and Palestine and Mills Legal Clinic alum Omar Shakir (SLS ‘13). Human Rights Watch had challenged a 2017 amendment to Israel’s Law of Entry that permitted the Israeli government’s decision to revoke Mr. Shakir’s work visa in May 2018. The law allows Israel to ban foreigners based on support for the boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) movement.

Op-Ed: Graduate students on SUP’s future

We are doctoral students in the humanities and social sciences, and we are writing to express our unwavering support for the continued, renewable funding of Stanford University Press and the establishment of a major endowment such as that of Harvard and Princeton University Presses. We strongly believe that SUP should be a necessary item in Stanford’s budget, just as our Ivy League peer institutions have done with their own academic presses.

Op-Ed: Save Stanford’s world-class press

I am writing to you as a scholar of the Holocaust and as a two-time Stanford University Press author. I was distressed to read this past week in various news sources that you plan to significantly cut support for the press. According to those who work closely with SUP, this cut could lead to the demise of one of the nation’s premier outlets for academic scholarship. It is difficult for me to understand how one of the world’s richest educational institutions could be so shortsighted as to risk such a dire outcome, even in a budget year that you have described as “tight.” I am writing in the hope that you can still be convinced to reverse this misguided decision and save the reputation of your university.

Campus Worker Profile: Week five

The Campus Workers’ Rights Coalition and members of CSRE35SI: An Introduction to Labor Organizing have put together a series of profiles drawn from both archival and current interviews with workers on-campus to highlight both the struggles that workers at Stanford face and the resilience that they bring to the work they do. Campus workers often have to deal with chronic understaffing and difficult menial labor. Alongside this, Stanford does not pay its workers a living wage despite the rising costs of food, health, and housing in the Bay, and workers must often cover many of their own health costs because of a lack of insurance benefits while managing hours-long commutes due to a dearth of affordable housing.

Op-Ed: Blood in Caracas

I met Jaime Barrio when he came to the US. He was an engineering student with a passion for building and racing go-karts. His team stayed at my Airbnb while attending an international dune-buggy competition. Now he’s back in Caracas, Venezuela where a hostile government allows a humanitarian crisis to worsen daily. We talk on WhatsApp when his electricity works and I’ve helped him write the following account of his experience: