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Natachi Onwuamaegbu
Natachi Onwuamaegbu is a freshman from Bethesda, Maryland. She is currently undecided but is leaning towards Political Science and English. Currently, Natachi is part of the Black Student Union and hopes to run a radio station on campus. When she's not wandering around campus, Natachi likes to sit in the sun, listen to music and overuse semi-colons.

An open letter to black freshmen

Being black at Stanford is tough. After all, Stanford is white. It’s overwhelmingly white, even if speckled with bursts of color and culture. In this new space, your identity is defined by snap judgements and incorrect assumptions. Being black at Stanford means being defined by your differences. It can be polarizing and scary and very,…

Changing the way we teach race

In the eighth grade I was asked if I wanted to step out of the room while the class learned about slavery. When I politely declined, I was allowed to sit with my classmates as we were taught the wonders of slave culture — the music and religions cultivated from a beautiful blend of two cultures,…

The pressure to create the next “big thing”

Last week, my creative writing teacher challenged our class to come up with project ideas. “Brainstorm what you want to do,” she encouraged, glancing over the students’ worried faces. “After all, it is your class.” She gave us the freedom to create. We had the power to invent a new character, a new scene. This…

My endless fountain of youth

Right now I’m a feminist, a struggling atheist, a rookie writer, a bad artist, an undeclared freshman. I don’t know what I want to major in, what I want to be or what I want my future to look like. Right now, “the future” is a vague, grayish dot somewhere in the periphery of my…

Why I want to save the world but I probably can’t

At the end of my Inequality in American Society introductory seminar last quarter, my professor decided to close with words of supposed hope. We spent the quarter looking at the worst aspects of American society: the nuances, the inevitability of inequality, the lack of partisan participation. By the end, the sadness of inequality paired with the…

Finding faith at Stanford

I’ve been to church once since I arrived at Stanford 10 weeks ago — this past Sunday, for about 15 minutes. I’m accompanied by an incessant baby yelping on cue every 12 seconds and a group of tourists taking their Christmas card pictures in front of the main altar, the mother loudly “whispering” directions to…

Feminism, sexual assault and ‘The Cosby Show’

Theo Huxtable was my first true love. I loved him through his haircut transitions (from close shave to full-out fade), his regrettable fashion statements, through his love life, his infected piercing, his youth. If you are unfamiliar, Theo Huxtable is the son of Dr. Cliff Huxtable’s son in the NBC hit series “The Cosby Show.”…

Why I don’t say the N-word

“N***as in Paris” is my favorite song. I can’t count all the angst-filled drives to and from high school filled with angry rapping — I don’t think you can call what I do rapping, but regardless — and yelling explicit lyrics at the top of my lungs, windows down, hitting the steering wheel. And whenever…

The perils of not being creative

College is my chance, I told myself. In middle school, in high school, when I didn’t audition for the school play or take that ballet class or try to do chorus, I always told myself: College is my chance. The funny thing about College Me is that it almost uncannily resembles High School Me. I still…
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