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Mark York

‘Hitchhiker’s Guide’ to unusual narrative

Dear reader, I am a proud narrative analyst — no, that is NOT a title I simply gave myself; do not inquire about the subject further. As a narrative analyst, I must assume that storytelling requires technique, or at the very least, little acts of intent to make it work. This assumption helps me sleep…

‘Ace Attorney’ in the real world

Sometimes, the best of products come from the most seemingly mundane ideas, and this is true of “Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney.” While I must wonder how any sane mind thought of creating a video game series about defense attorneys, we got something incredible out of the phenomenon. With its over-the-top, cartoonish and dramatized take on…

The mind of an author with Robert Dugoni

It can be easy to forget, dear reader, that there is more to an author than a name on the cover. There is a mind to them, and a heart, too — after all, machines have not claimed the writing field quite yet (see the algorithmically produced “Harry Potter and the Portrait of what Looked…

A newcomer’s thoughts on ‘Endgame’

There is nothing quite like the Marvel Cinematic Universe — that is, if you ignore DC, which is generally a wise decision. The intertwined structuring of Marvel’s films allows characters and plot points from initially independent films to coexist; an element from “Thor,” for instance, might play a role in “Iron Man 3,” even though…

Lasting notes from National Poetry Month

To celebrate the close of National Poetry Month, Reads writers gathered to rhapsodize on some of their favorite poems. Katherine Silk, Staff Writer “Daffodils” by William Wordsworth When I visited Williamsburg, Virginia, over spring break with a friend, one of the highlights for me included exclaiming in delight as I spotted patches of bright yellow…

Up: The ninety-minute masterpiece

It has been ten years since the premiere of Pixar’s “Up,” and I’m feeling old. Putting aside my personal age-related crises, however, this has always been a special movie for me. I was charmed when I first saw it in theaters, falling in love with the imaginative concept of an elderly man tying balloons to…

Reading between the lines for love

In celebration of this season of love, Reads writers share some of their favorite works that delve into the human heart and explore the depths of friendship, romance and more.   Audrey Mitchell, Contributing Writer “The Time Traveller’s Wife”  (Audrey Niffenegger) “Had we but world enough, and time…” The first time Clare and Henry meet…

Wizard puberty and other less important matters

I do wish I had it in me to cover more niche topics with my articles. And one day, I might find the inspiration to discuss the philosophical writings of a 12th-century fisherman or to analyze the symbolic significance of corn husks in Russian literature. For the time being, my tastes remain disappointedly mainstream. Thus,…

‘Romeo and Juliet’ Is NOT a Love Story: CHANGE MY MIND!

With that scandalous title out of the way, I assume, dear reader, that you are not unacquainted with Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.” Quite honestly, it’s difficult to avoid — there’s the original play, the stage musical, an adaptation with feuding caterers, the anime in which Romeo and Juliet work to take down a tyrannical government,…

The magic trick behind Disney’s adaptations

The world does not need another article about Disney. It’s not like this behemoth is growing obsolete anytime soon — nobody is joining hands, chanting “I believe” to bring the Disney fairy back to life. This studio is a media glutton, and the works produced by this brand will continue to influence generations to come.…

[copy rw] The Sparrow

“I’ll be right back.” The child blissfully, perhaps naively, believed him, her wide bright eyes full of precious awe as she saw him disappear into the overgrowth — a dense, unexplored region of shadowy forest. Five years have passed since then, and those words soon became tragic lies; she’s 10 now and that innocent child…

‘The Lorax’ and the virtues of simplicity

When it comes to storytelling, I often find myself an advocate for simplicity… and yes, that doesn’t sound too exciting. I admit, simplicity is not glamorous, especially nowadays. In a world full of cinematic universes and intricate, clockwork RPGs, complexity has never before looked so appealing and I feel simplistic storytelling has been undeservedly left…
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