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Jacob Kuppermann
Jacob Kuppermann writes about music for the Arts & Life Section of the Stanford Daily. He is currently undecided, both in regards to his major and towards the world as a whole, but enjoys biology, history, playing guitar & bass, and thinking about the Chainsmokers.

What you (maybe) missed: Vol. 1

What You (Maybe) Missed is the Daily’s new roundup of important, interesting and underlooked musical releases from the past few weeks, cataloging the stuff you may have missed out on while studying for your midterms, or whatever it is you kids do these days. Every week, we’ll have some singles, albums, and other musical discoveries…

Kali Uchis and Jorja Smith rejuvenate Frost

Holding a music festival is, in general, a bad idea. The logistics on either end are hellish— you’re handling the specific needs of four or more performers and their accompanying entourages and stage sets, or wrangling thousands of people in various stages of coherence and intoxication as they loiter for hours waiting for headlining acts…

‘Old Town Road’ and the cowboy myth

For the past month, the biggest song in America has been about cowboys. If you’ve managed to avoid “Old Town Road,” the unlikely viral hit by rapper/country singer/Twitter personality Lil Nas X, here’s the quick summary — it clocks in at slightly less than two minutes (making it the shortest number one hit in a…

‘The Addams Family’ is a macabre marvel

Most theatrical performances begin with a short, functional reminder to silence your cellphones and abstain from recording. It’s not really a part of the show itself — it’s a courtesy notice, the kind of thing you throw in more because it’d be bad if you didn’t rather than any positive force toward it. Ram’s Head…

VII Wonders: Gabriel Townsell on Rap, Wrestling and Life

Over the past few years, VII has built an impressive resume both at Stanford and his native Chicago — one that speaks to an artistic spirit and skill beyond his years, fueled by a dedication to his craft and a relentless pursuit of new creative avenues. You may have seen him performing at Blackfest in 2018, where he opened for 2 Chainz; he competed in the Stanford Concert Network’s Battle of the Bands in January of this year, and he was featured at Kairos’ Wine & Cheese night in November. Maybe you’ve heard the two mixtapes he dropped on Soundcloud this summer, in addition to Marketable Melancholy.

Spotify’s new block feature is worse than useless

Spotify’s recently announced “Don’t Play this Artist” feature, which would allow individual listeners to choose certain artists to effectively block from their streaming libraries, is beginning to be offered to select users as part of a roll out of the feature to the general public. While the company’s marketing for this feature showcases mundane usages…

What does it feel like to be spoken over?

When the Stanford College Republicans announced that they were bringing Dinesh D’Souza to campus, the response from the Jewish community on campus was swift and almost universally negative. It makes sense! We, as members of the Jewish community, have a lot to be mad at D’Souza for — his (since retracted) retweet of a tweet…

Drake combines success with social media spectacle

Drake has had a weird year. By any objective metric, the Canadian rapper/singer/pop giant, who needs no other introduction, has had one of the best years a pop star has had since the dawn of recorded music. He held the number-one spot on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart for 16 of the 21 weeks…

Mitski doesn’t need much time to devastate you

Mitski doesn’t need much time to devastate you. On “My Body is Made of Crushed Little Stars,” the burning heart of her 2016 breakthrough album “Puberty 2,” it takes her exactly one minute and 56 seconds to break down her entire psyche into a mass of anxieties, from not knowing how to make rent to…
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Frost 2018: Glass Animals performs with care, charisma and creativity

The Stanford Stadium is not anyone’s favorite piece of architecture. It’s a stadium, with all the logistical requirements implied in a venue of its size and stature — big concrete pillars, uncomfy seats, copious astroturf — and so it on its own, as just a building, is a dead, rigid place. It takes people —…

The Patience of Pusha T

Pusha T is a patient man. You can just tell from his music, the way the he sneers out every line he raps like he’s waited years to say it, to boast about how he’s made it and to look down on you from up high. You can also tell from his release schedule —…

What was pop in 2017?

2017 was the year streaming broke pop music. Not in a financial sense – though last year was the first year that on-demand streaming made up a majority of American music consumption – but on some deeper, more fundamental level. Where in prior years streaming felt like an added layer to the picture of the…

Album(s) of the Year, part 5: Rising stars

The Music Beat’s Album of the Year coverage concludes with two expansive, genre-defying albums from two of music’s brightest new stars: the waves of sound of Japanese Breakfast’s “Soft Sounds From Another Planet” and the unabashed self-love and critique of SZA’s “CTRL.” Japanese Breakfast, “Soft Sounds From Another Planet” — Jacob Kuppermann Roughly 57 seconds…

Album(s) of the Year, part 1: The personal

This article is the first in a five-part Music beat series for our candidates for Album of the Year. While these albums span a wide range of musical and stylistic territory, they all deeply affected at least one of our writers. We’re starting off our accounting of the year in (exceptional) music with two intensely personal…

St. Vincent’s messy, dazzling ‘MASSEDUCTION’

“MASSEDUCTION” is a disorienting album. This is a good thing, as when you’re six albums into a decade-and-a-half-long, critically acclaimed indie rock career like Annie Clark’s — the multi-instrumentalist who goes by St. Vincent — is, you need to disorient your listeners. While it’s certainly possible to screw up the artistic experimentation that creates this…

On the impossibility of separating art from artist

There is perhaps no story repeated more often in the annals of pop culture than that of the brilliant artist who is revealed to be a vile person. The only phenomenon that could possibly rival it in sheer pervasiveness is the chorus of voices that respond to any accusation of serious wrongdoing by an artist…

‘Lil Pump’ is not worth your time

“Lil Pump,” the self-titled debut by 17-year-old South Floridian rapper Lil Pump, is a waste of your time. This is not to say that it’s a bad mixtape — it is, but that’s almost beside the point — but simply that there’s barely anything new here, nothing of note that hasn’t been done better and smarter…
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