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Harrison Hohman
Harrison Hohman is a junior from Omaha, Nebraska majoring in Economics and Iberian-Latin American Cultures. He enjoys sports, politics, music, and other stereotypical college-age interests, and ties far too much of his self-worth to his middling abilities on the pool table . You can find him at Kappa Sig, the Huang basement or the rejected pile at Goldman.

Eliminate SOE

This past week, a Daily columnist wrote an article entitled “In Defense of Standards of Excellence.” Her argument in favor of the administrative process that recently unhoused the TDX fraternity (before the decision’s reversal) was well written and, on a superficial level, reasonable. However, the foundation upon which many of her claims lie is a…

TDX and the End of Greek Life at Stanford

TDX never received an ultimatum. There was no final warning, specific crime or particular indication that it was all going wrong. Instead, they got an email: “We have decided to remove Theta Delta Chi from the facility at 675 Lomita Drive beginning academic year 2019-2020.” Theta Delta Chi’s demise, pending an appeal, is a sad…

New approach, same bureaucracy

Last week, in an email sent to all Stanford undergraduates, the Office for the Vice Provost of Student Affairs promised, in its own words, “a new approach” to alcohol policy on campus. In vague terms, the message detailed a supposed epidemic of binge drinking on campus and a series of forthcoming administrative efforts to curtail…

OCS and the veneer of justice

The Office of Community Standards (OCS) at this school is entrusted with a lofty moral mandate: They alone are singularly responsible for ensuring that the Honor Code and Fundamental Standard of the University are upheld by all members of the Stanford community. The office’s task is a thankless one, and one constantly beset by controversy…

The case for saving the Stanford social scene

The Stanford social scene is dead — or, at the very least, on life support. The case for that claim is obvious enough to anyone with eyes and a few free hours on a weekend night. The case for why it should be kept alive, however, is a different one, and as far as the university…

A Requiem for the Stanford Social Scene

Last Saturday night, I walked alone down Mayfield Avenue. Most of the windows in the row houses were dark, and, but for a distant car or two, the street was silent. It was eerie, spectral even, and a stark reminder of just how much this campus has changed in my own time here. Ask almost…

The not-so-radical case for de-zoning San Francisco

The cityscape of San Francisco is an iconic one: a fist of land jutting out into blue water, blanketed with bucolic hills and Victorian homes; iconic bridges guarding its periphery and cultural landmarks lying in the shadows of glass towers, reaching ever higher toward the clouds. But to the west of that postcard image of…

The egregious exceptionalism of Palo Alto

“Palo Alto is an elitist sh*t den of hate.” “Kind capitalism is a myth and our city is proof.” “I hate ‘social justice’ in Palo Alto. What a f*cking joke.” The messages — or rather, tweets — are uncompromising in their boldness; brash and confrontational, with a clear target for their ire and a disdain…

The fatal flaw of ‘white privilege’

Some of the defining pillars of the modern college experience–its culture, politics and perception by the general public included–have all undergone seismic changes in recent years. American awareness of the “ism’s” (racism, sexism, homo/transphobia, etc.) and the rise of identity politics to accompany them have fundamentally altered the way that students both at Stanford and…

Re-examining Drake’s legacy

A brief Instagram post last week heralded the release of Scary Hours, a duet of tracks from hip hop superstar Drake, titled “God’s Plan” and “Diplomatic Immunity.” The songs were always bound to get millions and millions of plays regardless of their quality – such is the commercial and critical stature of the Canadian rapper.…

The political celebrity class

Political talk at the dinner table is a staple of the holiday season. For me personally, this past break was in large part no different, but one refrain seemed to stand out above the rest, not out of novelty but rather due to sheer repetition. “Well today, Rush said (insert predictable conservative stance on environmental…

Affirmative action and Appalachia

During the 2016 election, Appalachian America received unprecedented levels of press. The lion’s share of these stories related to the region’s collective malaise – a potent combination of job loss, drug use and outright poverty – and attempted to use these cultural ills as an explanation for the people’s rabid and widespread support of Donald…

The moral demise of the GOP

I consider myself a conservative. This alone shouldn’t be cause for concern (although on this campus, I’m certain not everybody would agree with that sentiment). The label itself encompasses a wide variety of political viewpoints that range from “reasonably moderate” to “radically regressive.” And for the better part of the last 60 years, these widely…

The reframing of the Kaepernick debate

The world has been a pretty turbulent place these last few weeks. And yet, despite the disasters – both natural and manmade – that have characterized this past month, one story continues to receive an outsized amount of coverage. Indeed, NFL players kneeling for an anthem has received more attention in many circles than some…

Keeping political dissent productive

For the record, I personally think that our president is very, very far from an ideal, or even competent leader. But to group him alongside a man who killed 30 million people is both naive and downright counterproductive.

In defense of gun rights

But what bothers me even more about this debate than my personal inability to establish a position is the monolithic group thought that dominates this campus’ collective opinion – the widespread belief that there is only one right answer and that any degree of informed dissent is downright blasphemy.

Has tech gone too far?

It’s generally assumed that technology is a good thing. The word itself brings up images of unprecedented inventions, medical breakthroughs and a more streamlined life. But do those images truly reflect the impact technology has had on our lives? The answer is a more complicated one than some may think.
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