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‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’: Reflections on a Beatles opus, 50 years on

This month, we celebrate 50 years since “Sgt. Pepper” taught the world to listen. As the years ran on, the “foreign” modes of this thirty-five-minute-long album (Hinduist philosophy, ‘20s music-hall, hippie stoner culture) became familiar, lodged into a generation’s memory bank. But can we separate the legacy from the musical text? What else is there to glean in “Pepper” in 2017, beyond…

Q&A: Daveed Diggs muses on fame, the accessibility of theater

On Wednesday evening, Tony- and Grammy-Award winning actor Daveed Diggs — best known for his roles as Thomas Jefferson and Marquis de Lafayette in the national musical phenomenon “Hamilton” — spoke to an excited, fan-filled crowd at Dinkelspiel Auditorium. Currently stretching his legs in television, including parts in “Black-ish” and “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” Diggs is…

An evening with Daveed Diggs at Dinkelspiel

“I call myself a nerd all the time,” said “Hamilton” superstar Daveed Diggs to Nerd Nation at Dinkenspiel Auditorium. Last night, at an electrifying event hosted by the Stanford Speakers Bureau, the Tony and Grammy Award winning actor spoke with coolness, casualness and a refreshing candidness. On-point undergrad moderator Michelle McGhee ’18 superbly guided the discussion…

Our fair lady: Audrey Hepburn classics (‘Roman Holiday,’ ‘Sabrina’) at the Stanford Theatre

Billy Wilder once said, “There could be no more perfect Cinderella than Audrey Hepburn.” This weekend, Stanford and the Bay Area get to ride around with Cinderella in two of her most beloved vehicles. The Stanford Theatre will screen 35 mm prints of William Wyler’s “Roman Holiday” (1953) and Billy Wilder’s “Sabrina” (1954), this Friday through Sunday, May 12-14. “Roman…

Terence Davies’ and Cynthia Nixon’s Emily Dickinson biopic burns with ‘A Quiet Passion’

What joy in this film! No, it’s not “joyful”; in fact, it’s glum and depressing and painful to watch. It’s from Terence Davies, Britain’s cinemaster of ex-Catholic, gay, working-class, spiritualized pain, director of such brutally personal masterworks as “Distant Voices, Still Lives” (1989) and “The Long Day Closes” (1992). It’s about a poet, Emily Dickinson, whom Garrison…

Master director Terence Davies talks Emily Dickinson, Brando, and growing up on movies

“I’m very good at misery and death,” says Britain’s greatest working director in his soothing, musical rasp. “Just a bit short of the ol’ joie de vivre!” Yet one look at “A Quiet Passion” (the latest masterwork from Terence Davies, his biopic on Emily Dickinson) and you must doubt that statement, however jesting and joshing. Davies’ early career (his bleakest work…