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Interview: Postcard Boy’s sophomore EP ‘Limbo’ reveals mixed emotions during transitions

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On July 14, Postcard Boy released his sophomore EP “Limbo” — a compilation of six tracks written during his summer between high school and college about his transition from adolescence to adulthood.

He amassed over six million Spotify streams across 250k+ monthly listeners and was featured on their Anti Pop, Bedroom Pop, Chill Vibes, Indie Pop and Indie Chillout playlists. In addition to Spotify, his music is available on other streaming platforms like SoundCloud. Fusing genres such as hip hop, punk, indie and electronic, Postcard Boy dives deeper into a motley of conflicting emotions and creates music in his dorm room.

(Photo: Charlie Alexander)

San Diego musician and visual artist Garrett Seamans is the individual behind the mask of Postcard Boy. He started out as a filmmaker and photographer under the pseudonym “phylm” and had shot for brands such as Volcom and Brixton, with subjects including LANY and Emma Chamberlain.

According to Postcard Boy, film, photography and music have been a major part of his life ever since he was young. He used to produce videos for a blog with his sister as well as LEGO stop motion videos in elementary school. In addition, he taught himself how to play the ukulele and guitar. When he reached middle school, he became fascinated with surf videography and created GoPro videos.

Postcard Boy gradually progressed into other categories like fashion and lifestyle, and he revealed that he started producing songs because he would edit his videos to electronic music.

“I never transitioned out of one and into the other. It is a free-flowing process depending on what I might feel inspired to do that day. I’m always learning and looking to try out new ideas for both media,” Postcard Boy said.

The singer disclosed that his biggest influences in music are his friends who are talented artists.

“It’s so nice to have people to talk to who understand where I’m coming from if I’m struggling on a song or need advice on anything,” Postcard Boy said. “A lot of these music friends started with me being a fan of them. Now, we’re just friends who’ll talk about day-to-day life outside art.”

Postcard Boy revealed his songwriting formula, which begins with him creating a 16-bar loop. The major obstacle he constantly faces is expanding it to a full song.

“I’m just going to continue experimenting with workflows to keep me inspired through the frustration that happens when I feel stuck. It’s a tough cycle, but it challenges me to be more creative and to try something new,” Postcard Boy said.

(Photo: Charlie Alexander)

The idea for his EP “Limbo” emerged when he was on a vacation with his family one summer. According to Postcard Boy, his EP was greatly influenced by his complex feelings on departing from the place where he grew up and the upcoming insecurities he will face in the future. The singer mentioned that writing his EP during the summer between high school and college was therapeutic.

“Writing in general for me can be super helpful because when I try to articulate how I’m feeling, ideas fall out that I didn’t even know I was experiencing. Journaling was super important to me that summer,” Postcard Boy said.

According to the artist, it would be enlightening for him to hear and see one of his projects for the first time with no context. “I hope people will enjoy my EP sonically and my pieces visually,” Postcard Boy declared.

He continued, “If they dive into the lyrics, I’d hope they’ll feel some relation to what I was going through. Transitional phases reoccur so much in life for everyone, and I think this project thematically really encapsulates that.”

Postcard Boy claimed that there were two instances throughout his songwriting process in which he felt emotional about the intensity of his songs’ lyrics mixed with the instrumental.

“On ‘Dazed,’ the lyrics and production really fit perfectly on the ‘everything’ screams and the chaos of that outro. ‘We’ve Been Here our Whole Lives’ is my most emotionally intense song personally. The way it sonically feels like a somber, but gentle goodbye is so in line with the story of that track,” Postcard Boy said.

The second track, “Flight,” discusses more about an agenda-free summer with friends. According to Postcard Boy, his utopian summer experience during this coronavirus pandemic is to be able to hangout with his friends again.

Nevertheless, Postcard Boy’s most unforgettable gig was when he played one last show at Che Café in San Diego before he left for college.

 “It’s this sick little spot at University of California San Diego where a lot of bands play. I had played there a couple times, but my live band and I wanted to play once more before we all split up for school,” Postcard Boy said.

He continued, “We played the show with another San Diego band called ‘Almost Monday.’ What I remembered the most was when we played a cover of ‘Forever Young.’ At the time when all of us were leaving each other, it just hit us as everyone sang along to the chorus.”

According to Postcard Boy, he sees himself producing music, directing videos, helping other artists with their projects and touring around the world in five years.

Postcard Boy finished with empowering advice not only for aspiring singers, but for the general audience, “It can be so taxing and depressing to compare yourself to other people you perceive as more successful. I’m not saying just let life happen and everything will work out, but don’t constantly deprecate yourself because you aren’t where you want to be yet.”

(Photo: Charlie Alexander)

Contact Ron Rocky Coloma at rcoloma ‘at’ stanford.edu.

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Ron Rocky Coloma '24 is majoring in International Relations and Communication. He has a knack for interviewing celebrities and writing about entertainment. Some of his notable works feature a Grammy-award winning produced artist, a three-time Guinness World Record Breaker, and an Elvis Duran Artist of the Month recipient. Contact him at rcoloma 'at' stanford.edu.