The Daily stands in solidarity with the Black community. Read our editors’ statement.

Stanford in the NFL: Former Cardinal see first action as season kicks off

By

Stanford’s alumni made their mark in Week 1 of NFL play. Despite injury concerns sidelining several players, the majority of former Cardinal saw playing time this past weekend, including high-caliber performances from quarterback Andrew Luck, wide receiver Doug Baldwin and linebacker Blake Martinez.

Martinez had a big role to play for Green Bay this weekend. Not only did the rookie get the start at inside linebacker, he wore the helmet headset, calling plays for the defense on the field. Martinez made his mark early, recording his first NFL tackle on just the second play of the game. He finished his night with 5 solo tackles and 1 assist.

Other Cardinal rookies saw limited playing time. Falcons tight end Austin Hooper primarily spent time on special teams, although he caught one 14-yard pass in the third quarter, his only target of the game. Joshua Garnett, Kyle Murphy and Brennan Scarlett were healthy scratches, with the chance to earn playing time as the season continues and positions solidify.

After spending much of last season sidelined with injuries, Andrew Luck returned to his starting role at the center of the Indianapolis Colts offense. Despite seeing limited practice time due to concern over a lingering shoulder injury, the fifth-year veteran looked to be at the top of his game Sunday night, going 31-for-47 for 385 yards and 4 touchdowns.

On the other side of the ball, David Parry got the start for the Colts, finishing the night with 1 solo tackle. Henry Anderson, the other half of Stanford’s defensive tackle duo, sat out the game as he continues to rehab from the torn ACL he sustained last season. Anderson’s injury has healed well, but the Colts determined he needed more time to get back into football form.

In Seattle, another Stanford pair made their presence known with strong performances on offense and defense. Doug Baldwin has evolved into one of Russell Wilson’s favorite targets, leading the Seahawks with 9 receptions on 11 targets for 92 yards. He also caught the game-winning touchdown with just 31 seconds left on the clock. Cornerback Richard Sherman added to his long resume, playing every defensive snap for Seattle and coming away with 3 combined tackles.

Another Stanford grad was tasked with stopping the Seahawks. Miami Marlins safety and newly anointed special teams captain Michael Thomas got the start in Seattle on Sunday, ending his night with both a defensive tackle and a special teams tackle.

In his Saints debut, tight end Coby Fleener went 1-for-4 but saw significant playing time, coming in on 81 percent of offensive snaps. In Philadelphia, Zach Ertz, another Tight End U product, was targeted 7 times, making 6 grabs for 58 yards, including an incredible one-handed catch for 15 yards. Unfortunately, Ertz was injured in the game and is now listed as week-to-week with a rib displacement in the collarbone area.

In other injury news, Buffalo Bills tight end Jim Dray got the start on Sunday but was soon sidelined as he re-aggravated a preseason ankle injury. His status is questionable.

 

Contact Olivia Hummer at ohummer ‘at’ stanford.edu.

While you're here...

We're a student-run organization committed to providing hands-on experience in journalism, digital media and business for the next generation of reporters. Your support makes a difference in helping give staff members from all backgrounds the opportunity to develop important professional skills and conduct meaningful reporting. All contributions are tax-deductible.


Get Our EmailsDigest

Olivia Hummer '17 is a managing editor of The Daily's sports section and writes about volleyball, football and baseball. When she's not filling in as an emergency copy editor, she can be found curled up in a ball bemoaning the misfortunes of her beloved Seattle Mariners or cursing the misuse of the Stanford Athletics logo. Olivia is a senior majoring in history from Covina, California, and can be reached at ohummer 'at' stanford.edu.