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Police report: Brock Turner admits sexual contact, denies alleged rape

Freshman swimmer Brock Turner (above) last swam for Stanford against Pacific on Jan. 10. (HECTOR GARCIA-MOLINA/StanfordPhoto.com)

Trigger warning: This article discusses an alleged sexual assault in detail.

In a police report filed Jan. 28, Brock Turner admits to having sexual contact with the alleged victim but denies nonconsensual intercourse during the Jan. 18 incident that precipitated his arrest on suspicion of attempted rape.

Turner was a Stanford freshman and varsity swim team member at the time but has since voluntarily withdrawn his status as a Stanford student. He has since been charged with five felony counts: rape of an intoxicated person, rape of an unconscious person, assault with the intent to commit rape, sexual penetration of an intoxicated person and sexual penetration of an unconscious person. He is scheduled to be arraigned Monday.

The police report indicates that, at the time of his arrest in the early morning of Jan. 18, Turner was under the influence of alcohol.

The alleged victim is not a Stanford student.

Turner was reportedly discovered on top of the alleged victim at about 12:55 a.m. by two male graduate students who were biking by. The students reported thinking “it was a mutual interaction at first” but noticed that the alleged victim was not moving and confronted Turner.

One of the graduate students stated that Turner got up and began to run away, and after briefly checking on the alleged victim, one of the graduate students chased after him. He said he caught up to Turner, tripped him and tackled him. The two graduate students — neither of whom knew Turner or the victim — held Turner down.

Police arrived on the scene a few minutes later and found the alleged victim lying behind a dumpster with her dress and bra disheveled and underwear on the ground nearby. She was “breathing but completely unresponsive.” An open can of beer was found laying nearby. Police took the alleged victim to the hospital, and she did not regain consciousness until approximately 4:15 a.m.

Another witness approached the officer and stated that there was a male being held down by two other witnesses approximately 75 feet away, saying to the officer that, “‘It was that guy who did it’.” Turner was detained and later arrested, and the officer noted that he “had a strong odor of an alcoholic beverage emanating from his person.”

At 6:36 a.m. on Jan. 18, an officer administered Turner his Miranda Advisement. The officer reports that Turner verbally answered yes to all four of the questions and that, at that time, he believed Turner was not under the influence of alcohol.

In the statement, Turner stated that he met the alleged victim outside the the Kappa Alpha fraternity house after going to the house to attend a party. He stated that he and the alleged victim kissed, held hands while walking away from the house, then kissed on the ground.

Turner stated that that he took off the victim’s underwear, fingered her vagina and touched her breasts. He said that he never took his pants off, that his penis was never exposed and that he did not penetrate the alleged victim’s vagina with his penis.

He told the police officer that he started to feel unwell and got up to leave when he was tackled to the ground. The officer asked why he ran, and Turner denied running.

Turner reported that by the time of the incident, he had consumed approximately seven cans of beer and a couple of sips of whiskey. He reported being drunk but was able to provide his account of the events to the police.

In the report, he is quoted as stating that “his ‘intentions were not to try and rape a girl without her consent’.”

Turner was later transported to the San Jose Main Jail.

According to a statement given to police by the alleged victim the night of Jan. 18, the alleged victim was on campus with a friend. The alleged victim and her friends met at a party at KA.

One of the friends found a handle of vodka that, according of the police report, they believe was sealed at the time. The group of friends passed around the handle, and in the police report the alleged victim reported nothing unusual about its taste.

She reported being at KA for 20 to 30 minutes before leaving the house. Outside, she and her friends conversed with a group of three college-aged males. One of them gave her a beer can that the victim believes she opened herself.

After drinking the beer, the alleged victim reports not remembering anything else until waking up at the hospital.

On the alleged victim’s cell phone, call logs indicate that at 12:35 a.m. the night of Jan. 18 she made a 35-second phone call and a seven-second phone call. She does not remember making either call.

Later, at 12:53 a.m. and 12:57 a.m., the alleged victim received text messages asking where she was. At 1:16 a.m., a friend sent her a message asking where she was. At 1:16 a.m., someone else sent another text message to the victim, “saying, ‘I’m scared’.”

While at the hospital on Jan. 18, the alleged victim underwent a SART examination and interview. SART is an acronym for sexual assault and response team, and such an exam is commonly known as a rape-kit.

At about 12:50 p.m. on Jan. 18, the alleged victim verbally agreed to the government’s prosecution of the suspect. The police later booked the SART kit, the victim’s blood and the victim’s clothing into evidence.

This article has been updated throughout the day as more details have become available.

 

Contact Alice Phillips at aliecp1 ‘at’ stanford.edu and Joseph Beyda at jbeyda ‘at’ stanford.edu.

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