Widgets Magazine

New ID Cards to feature space for Caltrain GoPass sticker

The old Stanford ID card, left, will be replaced with the new design, right, which features space for a Go Pass or Eco Pass sticker. (Photo: Piotr Marcinski / Shutterstock)

The old Stanford ID card, left, will be replaced with the new design, right, which features space for a Go Pass or Eco Pass sticker.
(Photo: Piotr Marcinski/Shutterstock, Courtesy of Stanford News, Edited by KATHERINE CARR/The Stanford Daily)

Starting this month, Stanford ID Cards have a new look to conform to the updated wordmark and visual identity system. The card will feature a white space to the right of the Stanford “S” logo to allow space for Go Pass and Eco Pass stickers for those eligible.

The Go Pass allows unlimited travel on the Caltrain between all zones. The Eco Pass provides travel for five transit services—VTA buses, VTA light rail, Dumbarton Express, Highway 17 Express and Monterey-San Jose Express.  Go Pass and Eco Pass are free to eligible hospital and University employees.

Previously two separate cards, the Stanford ID Card and Go Pass or Eco Pass can now be combined, creating more convenient use for employees and students.

“Because this card appears slightly different from existing cards, we would like to make sure all campus departments and services are aware of the change, to limit confusion over the legitimacy of the new cards,” said Jay Kohn, director of card services in a Stanford News article.

The change will not affect existing cards. New students and employees, as well as those who need a replacement card, will receive the new design. Replacement cards will continue to cost $20.

Officially known as Campus Cards, Stanford ID cards serve as identification, as electronic key cards to dorms, libraries, recreational facilities and dining halls, and as debit cards. With the Go Pass or Eco Pass sticker, the cards can now be utilized for transportation.

About Katherine Carr

Katherine Carr is a reporter for The Stanford Daily with a passion for science and public health. She comes to Stanford from Irvine, Calif., where she worked as a freelance writer for the Orange County Register. Carr is a prospective chemistry major and likes to write about science, politics and fashion. To contact her, please email kcarr2 'at' stanford.edu or follow her on Twitter @KatAnneCarr.