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Stanford Rose Bowl ticket allotment sells out rapidly amidst historic demand

Stanford Athletics announced on Tuesday afternoon that for the second year in a row, it had sold out its public allotment of tickets to the Rose Bowl Game. In addition, a limited allotment of student tickets and “student companion” tickets available to Stanford students with University IDs also sold out in less than two hours on Tuesday evening.

Stanford students had less than two hours to claim their Rose Bowl tickets before they sold out, but the Red Zone should count itself lucky; Stanford's public allotment was gone in just four minutes after the tickets went on sale Tuesday afternoon. (BOB DREBIN/StanfordPhoto.com)

Stanford students had less than two hours to claim their Rose Bowl tickets before they sold out, but the Red Zone should count itself lucky; Stanford’s public allotment was gone in just four minutes after the tickets went on sale Tuesday afternoon. (BOB DREBIN/StanfordPhoto.com)

However, controversy arose when it was revealed by some Michigan State fans that they had taken advantage of a Stanford Athletics offer to claim tickets from Stanford’s allotment as well, limiting the access to tickets for Cardinal fans.

Stanford Athletics had previously announced that up to four guaranteed tickets would be made available in advance to both season ticket holders and people who had made a deposit for 2014 season tickets before Rose Bowl ticket sales began. The remainder of the tickets would then be sold to non-season ticket holders through GoStanford.com starting at 4:01 p.m., after all of the guaranteed tickets had been allocated.

According to a Tweet by Senior Assistant Athletic Director Kurt Svoboda, the tickets available to the general public through Stanford sold out in just four minutes after sales opened.

The sellout came as little surprise after a tremendous season for Stanford. On the back of lofty expectations for the preseason top-five Cardinal, 2013 marked the first year in school history in which Stanford sold out its complete allotment of home games.

Yet there is concern that Michigan State fans may have played some part in the limited ticket availability for the Rose Bowl. Some Spartans fans revealed that they had paid Stanford’s season ticket deposit for access to guaranteed tickets in Stanford’s allotment. Because of this, a smaller allotment of Stanford’s tickets would have been available when the general sale later opened. That concern was fueled by the fact that the deposit for season tickets increased from $100 to $200 on Monday morning before the offer was later withdrawn altogether due to “high demand.”

Much of that concern was alleviated on Wednesday afternoon when two Tweets from Stanford’s Athletic Department — one from the official Stanford Athletics account and another from Svoboda — reported that 95 percent of Stanford’s allotment had gone to current season ticket holders and students.

Loophole aside, the overall high interest in tickets from Stanford’s opponent also contributed to the rapid sale. Last year, special circumstances had allowed Stanford to slightly exceed its usual allotment due to the fact that Wisconsin was playing in its third straight Rose Bowl and, thus, experienced lower-than-average demand. This year, with Michigan State playing in its first-ever BCS bowl and the historical significance of the 100th installment of the Rose Bowl, ticket allotments for Stanford were much more stringent and prices in the secondary market skyrocketed due to the increased demand.

The Detroit Free Press reported that tickets for this Rose Bowl are, on average, more than twice as expensive as they have been in years past. The average cost of a Rose Bowl ticket on the secondary market as of Tuesday night was reported to be $1,039. In comparison, the average value of a ticket on the secondary market at this point last year was just $432, and corresponding values for the Rose Bowls of 2012, 2011 and 2010 were also just $460, $496 and $466, respectively.

As of 2:00 p.m. Wednesday, the lowest-priced Rose Bowl ticket on secondary ticketing site StubHub was $575.00, for a seat in the upper end zone bleachers.

***

After the general allotment had sold out, student ticket sales opened at 9 p.m., giving students holding valid Stanford IDs the chance to purchase one ticket for themselves for $75 and one more ticket for a “student companion” for an additional $150. Although Stanford Athletics had initially announced that two companion tickets would be available for each student, that number was lowered to one just before student ticket sales opened. Both types of tickets rapidly sold out.

The student tickets went on sale during the 7-10 p.m. final exam slot and were gone shortly after the exam period ended.

Stanford and Michigan State will compete in the 100th Rose Bowl Game in Pasadena on Jan. 1.

This post was updated on Dec. 11 to include the percentage of tickets purchased by current season ticket holders and students as reported by Stanford Athletics and to include current secondary market ticket prices. It will continue to be updated.

Contact Do-Hyoung Park at dpark027 ‘at’ stanford.edu.

About Do-Hyoung Park

Do-Hyoung Park is the Managing Editor of Sports at The Stanford Daily. Even though he is finally able to get into R-rated movies now, he instead chooses to spend his time writing half the sports section every week. Do-Hyoung is a sophomore originally from Seoul, South Korea and raised in Saint Paul, Minnesota pursuing a major in chemical engineering. To contact him, please email him at dpark027 'at' stanford.edu.
  • Johnny Crap

    Let me guess, Bolley…. you didn’t go to Stanford.
    Right?

  • Johnny Crap

    We can send them to Palo Alto, if you’d like.

  • Suzy

    This wasn’t just a lack of common sense but outright stupidity. According to MSU fans, Stanford Athletic staff were so accommodating one told ‘Andrew’ he was now an honorary Spartan. EXCUSE ME ANDREW – DO YOU WORK FOR MICHIGAN OR STANFORD??? What were you thinking?! Giving away our tickets to the opposing team!! Good God this is disgusting!

  • Suzy

    With only 1600 tickets for the general sale allowing MSU fans to buy ONE ticket is sickening. Nothing but disloyalty and disrespect for Stanford alums and fans.

  • Sparty

    You might want to check your facts regarding bankruptcy. The CITY OF DETROIT has filed for bankruptcy. And, unlike what is portrayed by the Hollywood folk out there in California, The City of Detroit =/= the State of Michigan. In fact, the State of Michigan is in much better fiscal condition than most states in the union, and is in FAR better shape than the state of California, which may indeed declare bankruptcy at some point in the near future.

  • Code_Warrior

    I don’t know what’s more funny – MSU fans taking advantage of Stanford’s RB Ticket policy, or Kassandra debating the minutiae of the actual number of friends of MSUDersh that bought RB Ticket packages from Stanford! Kassandra’s valley girl level debating skills are priceless!

  • http://www.picsofcelebrities.net/blog/2012/05/08/voice-season-finale Cromulent

    Out of Michigan, please.

  • Kassandra

    clarified: largest city in the state of Michigan. of course, that doesn’t derail my original point.

    also Sparty, if you would have taken a second to read my post located right above yours, you would see that i am NOT from California so that whole part of your response was just plain unqualified and down right idiotic.

  • Kassandra

    you have to read Dersh’s comments yesterday to understand the conversation. it appears you did not. valley girl? nope, doesn’t apply. next time, try keeping things in context.

  • Rachael Moralez-Kindred

    I don’t blame the MSU fans for taking advantage of the offer. Wish I had thought of it myself, but I didn’t expect to not be able to buy a ticket since I had no problem last year. The thing that really bothers me is the athletic dept’s recent hard push for people to buy season tix. I normally buy a 3 game mini plan because I live 4+ hours away. The ticket sales person didn’t seem to care that I couldn’t attend more than 2-3 games, buy season tix anyway. On paper it looks great that we sold out all season tix for the first time in school history, but not everyone lives in the area so there are still empty seats. I wish they would offer more mini plans and give us some credit, we are still loyal fans! P.S. I’m also an alum.

  • JR

    I still don’t understand why Stanford alums didn’t opt to do what MSU fans did – ?? Not sure why they thought there would be an abundance of tickets that would be available by casually calling and placing an order. Perhaps they hadn’t been paying close attention to the season? We sold out every home game, and added SRO tickets for some of the last contests. If Spartan fans are going to find creative ways to achieve their objective, that’s their right – and they would feel right at home here in Silicon Valley, where that philosophy is used every day.

  • JR

    Frankly, I was in the stands for our home games and have slogged through many comments on Stanford articles and Stanford Football’s facebook and twitter sites – a LOT of Stanford fans seemed to have great difficulty in supporting their team long before these tickets went on sale. The Stanford “fans” who groused about Coach Shaw, our players, etc. are the ones who should be ashamed – one of the strengths of this team is that they have learned to play without depending on the emotional boost from the fans…because too often they don’t receive it.

  • JR

    Not true – student tickets were separate from the 32K allotment and were sold a couple days later; students also received a subsidized price for their ticket. Stanford certainly did not shut out its most consistent (and loudest) fan base.

  • JR

    The latest news is that some of those purchases are going to be negated if there is reasonable evidence of abuse, i.e. multiple applications for season tickets from same address and same credit card…and what makes you think that MSU were the only ones queueing up for the season ticket offer?

  • Suzy

    I can only speak for myself – why would I put a deposit on season tickets knowing I can’t follow through on the purchase? That would make me a liar and a cheat. Once Stanford realized MICHIGAN – the OPPOSING TEAM – was buying our tickets they should have IMMEDIATELY cancelled their boneheaded promo.

  • JR

    Exactly. I suspect that there are many savvy Stanford alums who are ticked that it didn’t occur to them to actually financially support their school AND get an early shot at Rose Bowl tickets…the defense “I didn’t sign up for season tickets because I live far away and can’t go to the home games” doesn’t hold water – since MSU fans wouldn’t be attending any of those games either, but were more than happy to contribute. Stanford alums simply got outplayed by just a FEW MSU fans, and are furious that they are looking at astronomical ticket prices on the open market. Most would still be in this situation whether this happened or not. Bottom line: season-ticket holders and Stanford students are the best way to fill Stanford stadium with support on game days, they brought it big-time this year, and those two demographics were given preferential treatment for tickets – as it should be at ANY school.

  • Kassandra

    that’s a great point, JR. it’s extremely likely that several of the 1600 tickets were purchased by Stanford fans. in the end, my guess is that only up to 1000 or so of the general sale tickets from Stanford’s allotment were purchased by MSU fans. i don’t really see that number creating a huge discrepancy between those supporting their respective teams when it’s taken into account that the stadium seats nearly 90,000.

  • JR

    Not a horrible idea by Stanford, imo – why shouldn’t they try to increase their season-ticket holders? It’s a completely different scenario in Palo Alto than the great tradition of Midwestern football fans (pretty much ANY other football fans, in fact!), and has taken years to get fans to consistently pack Stanford stadium.

  • JR

    BTW, it sounds like MSU was requiring a LOT more coin than Stanford for access to Rose Bowl tickets…

  • JR

    First off – the opposing team is Michigan State, not Michigan. Second, it doesn’t make anyone a liar or a cheat – it’s a deposit. If someone ultimately decided that their budget couldn’t support a season-ticket purchase and ultimately backed out, are they a liar or a cheat? And the terms are clear: it is non-refundable – if the purchaser decides to back out, it will cost them their deposit. The contract is two-sided: you have paid $200 towards your future season tickets and now have the option of Rose Bowl tickets, or you lose the $200 and option for season tickets while getting Rose Bowl tickets. No lying or cheating going on. This whole tempest in a teacup (seriously, I’d love to hear the ACTUAL number of tickets sold to “non-Stanford folk”) is due far more to the high cost on the open market. Last year I would have been better off going through stubhub to get good tickets – not so this year. People need to get a grip and move on.

  • JR

    Uh…actually last year’s Rose Bowl was heavily Stanford supported, significantly moreso than Wisconsin. We were actually permitted to purchase from their allotment. But I’m with you 100% on the rest of your comment – and at the end of the day people need to relax: no one is going to see a “sea of Spartan green” in the Stanford section. I’ll just think of the ones who are there as “honorary Stanford Pines”…!

  • Kassandra

    lol nice edit!

  • Michael Richards

    How does a band’s performance have anything to do with someone’s comprehension level? That’s way out of left field.

  • Michael Richards

    I don’t think Michigan St. fans are out to deny Stanford fans of wanting to go to the game. However it’s crystal clear that they want there to be more of them than of Stanford fans. I agree completely with what you said there as well as about last year’s contrast in the shades of red. I actually thought there were more Stanford fans than Wisconsin fans last year.

  • Michael Richards

    A voice of reason. At least on paper this looks like it’ll be one heck of a game between two very tough teams.

  • Michael Richards

    Are you retarded?

  • Michael Richards

    Do you have any evidence of this?

  • Suzy

    If someone puts down a deposit KNOWING they have no intention of following through – that makes them a liar and a cheat. Be that as it may – the blame here lies with Stanford. I don’t care that tickets were sold out – I care that
    tickets went to the OPPOSING team and the Stanford family has been thrown to
    the wolves. For what? $100 The greed is disgusting.

  • Michael Richards

    I haven’t bought tickets to this game myself, but it stands to reason there is some fine print allowing the ticket office to make such a determination (or, perhaps there is not. Typically in ticket sales of this nature, it’s there). If they were to do it would it be cool? No. Would it be legal? Likely.

  • Suzy

    MSU fans who made down payments on season tickets they never
    intended to follow through on were given PREFERENTIAL treatment over donors and
    alums who chose not to LIE. Stanford was
    fully aware MSU fans were buying tickets (one Stanford employee was told by an
    MSU buyer he was now an official Spartan).
    Stanford was fully aware MSU fans were not going to follow through on
    their season ticket purchase (some explicitly asked if it was going to be a
    problem and were assured it wasn’t).
    Stanford was fully aware of the limited number of tickets and chose to
    SELL THEM TO THE OPPOSING TEAM. Over
    alums. Over students. Over donors.
    And then LIED about it: “That’s untrue [re: MSU buying tickets]. A soaring number of
    season ticket holder orders consumed almost all of our RBG allotment by 4pm.” I
    never expected such treachery and unethical behavior from Stanford. Shame on them!

  • Code_Warrior

    Yeah, I read them all, and yours. I didn’t say you were a valley girl, I said you had valley girl level debating skills. In other words, you fail understand what has been said and then proceed to make a really stupid counterpoint. A trait which you are demonstrating yet again! ROFLMAO!

  • Jailin Rose

    Stockton, CA (which is less than 100 miles from the Stanford campus) and San Bernadido, CA (which is right next to Pasadena) both declared bankruptcy long before Detroit did. You may want to bite your tongue a bit, Kassy.

  • City Dweller

    stockton and san bernaRdino are both shitholes, much like Detroit. They don’t represent California, and legally speaking, they are separate entities from the State of California.

    With love,
    Los Angeles and San Francisco

  • Jailin Rose

    Google “Stanford Band 2013 Rose Bowl halftime performance” and that guy’s comment will make a lot more sense.

  • Jailin Rose

    Yeah, and the City of Detroit is also a separate entity from the State of MI.

    So they are just as relevant (or irrelevant, take your choice) as Kassy trying to equate Detroit to the entire state.

    Nearly 10 mm people live in MI, and less than 700,000 live in Detroit.

  • Jailin Rose

    What Svoboda is doing is trying to crack down on ticket brokers that created multiple accounts in order to scoop up tons of tickets, aka, “abused the system.”

  • City Dweller

    I know what you mean, but in all fairness if you are going to call her out for thinking detroit represents MI, I should point out that stockon and san bernardino hardly represent CA.

    Also, san bernardino is not even close to Pasadena. If you come out for the rose bowl, I invite you to take that hour and a half drive out to hell. You’ll realize what I mean. Same goes for Stockton.

  • Jailin Rose

    Fair enough!

    Though SB is less than 60 miles on the highway from the RB Stadium. That’s plenty close.

  • Kassandra

    how did i fail to understand? i know exactly what he said and i know exactly what you said. i didn’t say you called me a valley girl; i merely used those two words to say it does not apply. it’s not like i said “i am not a valley girl.” you seem to have less comprehension than Dersh. that’s the only logical conclusion to be drawn from your Johnny-come-lately dribble. you obviously have no sense of context, a trait which you are showing repeatedly! ROFLMFAO!

  • Kassandra

    what about the words “i’m not from California” do you not understand? i attend school there, yes, but i am not from there. not sure how many times i need to mention that for people like you to get it through your heads. besides, i was talking to someone from Michigan, NOT someone from Stockton nor San Bernardino (correct spelling, btw). your comment holds no water whatsoever.

    again, that still doesn’t derail my point about people from that state or city spending money outside of their state, now does it.

  • CAclassactionLegal

    You should call a few lawyers about that idea first as you will discover there wont be any takers, in CA entering into a contract to buy something you can’t afford to pay for all at once by putting down a deposit, that deposit is not an option to buy that item in the future at your discretion. If you entered into the contract with no intention of buying the product in order to gain a financial advantage (ie RB tix you would sell later at a higher price that would cover the cost of losing your deposit) is not only breach of contract on your part, but also potentially FRAUD. Especially if you were stupid enough to actually tell the person selling you those season tickets that you had no intention of buying them (and the calls are recorded btw), and that you were only putting the deposit down to gain the added incentive. At best for you, it is a contract entered into in “bad faith” ie abusing the system for personal gain, in which case returning your deposit and not providing the incentive is well within the law, and at worst you have committed fraud and could be prosecuted yourself, losing your deposit, and your RB tix, with the possibility of fines and/or jail time on top of it. If you get your deposit returned and lose your RB tix, you might want to just count your blessings, cut bait and change your IP address just to be safe. Also, a class-action suit against a place like Stanford, with one of the best law schools in the country and who have buildings full of lawyers just looking for something to do with their time, would cost you a whole hell of a lot more than your $100 deposit and your $100 RB tickets, but have at it!

  • sigh

    go home Kassandra, you’re drunk.

    Please realize that you are making yourself look foolish by commenting on every single post with a bitchy one-up comment. And please don’t respond to THIS post with one.

  • Kassandra

    i respond to what i wish. sorry, i don’t drink, so your first statement is completely asinine! lol

  • Michael Richards

    I did as you suggested. I don’t see how a band of goofballs equates to a lack of comprehension.

  • Michael Richards

    If a train leaves San Bernardino at 1 p.m. and another train leaves Pasadena at 1:30 p.m. …

  • Michael Richards

    A couple guys are basically telling her to look in her own back yard before talking about that of another person. Only the problem is California apparently is not her backyard. Seems reasonable for her to point that out.

  • Michael Richards

    Hey, just curious, Why’d you change your screen name?

  • Alex

    Thank you for posting this. It’s amazing how, for lack of a better word, idiotic some people are.

    All this gloating yet no one has physical tickets in hand. Don’t count your chickens until they roost…

  • Suzy

    A lot of people wouldn’t have taken advantage of that offer because it makes you a liar and a cheat when you enter a contract (season ticket purchase) in bad faith (no intention of following through) to get your paws on Rose Bowl tickets (benefit). It’s also against California contract law and makes your purchase of season tickets (and the accompanying Rose Bowl tickets) NULL AND VOID. You are both morally AND legally reprehensible.

    “Every contract made or performed in California is said to include an implied-in-law covenant of good faith and fair dealing, by which each party to the contract agrees to act in good faith and deal fairly with the other. This has been construed to mean that one party to a contract should not try in bad faith to cheat the other party of the benefit of the bargain made by the contract.”

  • Code_Warrior

    Another lame attempt to be clever that fails miserably. At least try to come up with your own material! You know, you’re right about one thing, valley girl level isn’t quite an accurate description of your debating skills, I think White Goodman level is more accurate. Here, let me quote White Goodman for you, maybe you can understand that: I know you, you know you, and I know you know that I know you. Go on and make your jokes Mr Jokey… Joke-maker!