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RT @StanfordSports: Our recap of Stanford's 45-0 win. Key takeways: McCaffrey has a bright future and the O-line still needs to gel http://…: 3 days ago, The Stanford Daily
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Center for International Security and Cooperation receives $1 million grant from Carnegie Corporation

Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) received a $1 million grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York to fund research and training on international peace and security projects over the next two years.

The grant will fund research on a variety of issues, including collaborative civilian-military operations aimed at strengthening communities in Afghanistan, several projects on improving nuclear security and a study of community policing interventions to increase public safety and stability in rural Kenya.

The grant will support former Secretary of Defense William Perry ’49 M.S. ’50 Ph.D. ’55; Siegfried Hecker, former CISAC co-director and a professor in the Department of Management Science and Engineering; Lynn Eden, CISAC senior research scholar; Joseph Felter Ph.D. ’05, a retired U.S. Army Colonel; and James Fearon, professor of political science.

“The breadth and extent of Carnegie’s support will be crucial in advancing CISAC’s research and teaching to help build a safer world,” said CISAC Co-Director Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar in a press release.

Last April, CISAC received a $2.45 million grant from The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation to train future specialists in nuclear security and support ongoing projects.

– Molly Vorwerck