California proposition results rolling in

(LAUREN WILSON/The Stanford Daily)

Proposition 30

Prop 30 temporarily increases the California sales tax and income tax on individuals making over $250,000. California Gov. Jerry Brown, the main proponent of the proposition, maintains that the increased tax revenue is necessary to head off billions of dollars in education cuts.

As of 8:03 a.m. (100.0 percent of precincts reporting), “Yes” is leading 53.9 percent to 46.1 percent. 

Proposition 31

Prop 31 is a combined initiative and California constitutional amendment. If passed, it will establish a two-year budget cycle for the state government, allow the governor to unilaterally cut the budget in fiscal emergencies and require performance reviews and goals in all state programs.

As of 8:03 a.m. (100.0 percent of precincts reporting), “No” is leading 60.8 percent to 39.2 percent.

Proposition 32

Prop 32’s passage would prevent unions and corporations from making campaign donations taken from paycheck deductions. It would also prevent unions and corporations from making direct contributions to candidates or committees.

As of 8:03 a.m. (100.0 percent of precincts reporting), “No” is leading 56.1 percent to 43.9 percent. 

Proposition 33

Prop 33 will enable insurance companies to issue rates based on the previous insurance history of the driver, providing better rates for drivers who have had insurance in the past.

As of 8:03 a.m. (100.0 percent of precincts reporting), “No” is leading 54.6 percent to 45.4 percent. 

Proposition 34

If passed, Prop 34 would repeal California’s death penalty and replace it with life in prison without parole. The law would apply retroactively to the 725 Californians currently on death row.

As of 8:03 a.m. (100.0 percent of precincts reporting), “No” is leading 52.8 percent to 47.2 percent. 

Proposition 35

Prop 35 increases prison terms for human traffickers and mandates police training on human trafficking, though the initiative does not make clear how its provisions will be funded.

As of 8:03 a.m. (100.0 percent of precincts reporting), “Yes” is leading 81.1 percent to 18.9 percent. 

Proposition 36

The passage of proposition 36 revises the “Three Strikes” law so that life-in-prison sentences would only apply if the third conviction were deemed “serious or violent.” As the law currently stands, a criminal faces life in prison after his/her third felony.

The AP has called the election for the “Yes” side. As of 8:03 a.m. (100.0 percent of precincts reporting), “Yes” is leading 68.6 percent to 31.4 percent.

Proposition 37

Prop 37 mandates, with loopholes and exceptions, the labeling of genetically-modified food to consumers and prohibits the labeling of genetically-modified foods as “natural.”

As of 8:03 a.m. (100.0 percent of precincts reporting), “No” is leading 53.1 percent to 46.9 percent. 

Proposition 38

Prop 38  increases the state income tax for most Californians for 12 years, putting the revenue towards pre-K to 12 education. The total revenue raised by the government if Prop 38 passes is estimated to be $10 billion over 10 years.

As of 8:03 a.m. (100.0 percent of precincts reporting), “No” is leading 72.3 percent to 27.7 percent.

Proposition 39

Prop 39 would require multi-state businesses to pay income taxes based on percentage of sales in California. The revenue raised over the next five years will be earmarked for energy efficiency projects.

As of 8:03 a.m. (100.0 percent of precincts reporting), “Yes” is leading 60.1 percent to 39.9 percent. 

Proposition 40

Prop 40 is a veto referendum that seeks to keep intact the California State Senate lines as drawn by the California Citizens Redistricting Commission in the 2010 legislative redistricting cycle. Opponents of the referendum — those who would nullify the citizens’ commission’s lines — announced on July 12 that they would not campaign against the referendum.

As of 8:03 p.m. (100.0 percent of precincts reporting), “Yes” is leading 71.4 percent to 28.6 percent. 

About Edward Ngai

Edward Ngai is a senior staff writer at The Stanford Daily. Previously, he has worked as a news desk editor, staff development editor and columnist. He was president and editor-in-chief of The Daily for Vol. 244 (2013-2014). Edward is a junior from Vancouver, Canada studying political science. This summer, he is the Daniel Pearl Memorial Intern at the Wall Street Journal.
  • http://www.facebook.com/ern.batavia Ern Batavia

    Kalifornia proves it’s idiocy once again…..tax your ass into prosperity – that’s the ticket.

  • MSM

    TAX ME TAX ME TAX ME TAX ME just keep doing the same thing i am positive we will get a different result THIS TIME won’t we