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Relationship abuse: The forgotten half of SARA

We as students can and should expect our administration to play a proactive role in addressing violence against women, rather than waiting to institute change until public anger surfaces. Thus, I urge SARA to live up to its name and not treat relationship abuse as an aside, casually slapped on to the end of an acronym, but rather address it with the severity that its victims and survivors deserve.

Sympathy and blame: Responding to rape

This seems to be an area in which men – the vast majority of the accused – are blatantly shown higher respect in the aftermath of these events compared to women – most often the victims. Rapists and sexual predators should be punished for their actions, and the level of distrust reserved for victims should not outweigh the level of distrust for perpetrators of sexual violence.

Harassment 101, part I: On the street

The statistical consensus of social science points to the overwhelming prevalence of street harassment as a gendered phenomenon that targets women disproportionately to men. This demonstrates that it is not sufficient to conclude that some men are malicious. Rather, street harassment represents a norm of a generalized, shared claim that men make to social power, and the ownership of women’s lives and sexual status.

Hey there, beautiful

Not only are the aforementioned arguments ineffective at deflating the video’s intent, they move us toward the wrong sorts of conversations regarding the matter at hand. Instead of trying to correct our reactions toward the video or determine whether people have a right to be offended, we ought to be focusing on discussing what the video intends to convey without minimizing or writing off any reactions to it.

The dark side of viral rage

When Chris Herries, a Stanford senior, spoke to Bloomberg about sexual assault, the Internet exploded. “Stanford Student Compares Rape to Not Locking Up Bike,” wrote Jezebel, a feminist website; a number of other publications followed suit. Commenters labeled Chris with epithets and speculated as to whether he had a criminal record. Women are not bikes…