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On living in fear of telling the truth: My experience with SAE, retaliation and Title IX

I am the student who was subjected to “intimidating and retaliatory conduct” based on a “false belief that [I] had reported Title IX concerns” whose experience was cited by the University in its recent decision regarding SAE. My story is a story of sexual harassment and retaliation against a Title IX witness. And unfortunately, it is a story shared by many people on this campus and beyond.

Crisis in Greek life

Something needs to be done to correct the harmful gender relations ongoing in Greek organizations. The very fact that Greek life, by definition, is based on a system of segregation of the sexes creates an us-them mentality that allows for sexual objectification, violence, and acceptance of set gendered roles. As a result, a dismantling or, at least, integration of the Greek system may be necessary to overcome the problems in gender relations.

Harassment 101, part II: At school

The connection between harassment and rape culture, then, becomes a matter of the beliefs that the perpetrators of these acts share. A culture in which harassment is normal directly contributes to a culture in which rape is common and permissible; in which Title IX is a joke, not a law that prohibits unsafe accommodations and environments for women; in which domestic violence leads three women every day to be killed by an intimate partner or former partner. It is important to take these abstract notions of gender and sexuality seriously because beliefs about gender and inequality influence women’s safety.