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Oh, it’s you again

In the day-to-day scheme of life at Stanford, I find myself running into the same people in the same spaces like clockwork. The consistency upholds to the extent that I even feel vaguely familiar with people I’ve never actually met after perpetually encountering them in classes and study spots that I frequent around campus. From…

Is modern romance dead or are my Tinder pictures just poorly angled?

Let’s say I am laying in my bed in unlaundered sweatpants as I watch “Titanic,” or “To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before,” an updated version of the forbidden love story archetype. As I inattentively watch these idealized romances play out on my laptop, I rapidly drag my finger right on my phone screen, affirming my attraction to a promising mirror selfie of a decent-looking Stanford student without a creepy or arrogant bio. In this *hypothetical* scene, something feels a bit wrong about my desire for instant gratification and my yearning for a scenario similar to that of the people slowly falling in love on the dusty laptop screen in front of me.

The unbearable flakiness of being

In my experience, the longer one spends at Stanford, the flakier one gets. Maybe the correlation arises because we get busier, dealing with real-life concerns like too many darn internships to apply to and a p-set we should have started four days ago. Maybe we do it because, hey, this person flaked on me once, and morality is relative, so I can flake on them. So we can just shoot the subject of flakery a quick text (So sorry but…) and get back to the grind, supposedly.