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Statement for delivery to President Marc Tessier-Lavigne, Provost Persis Drell and Vice Provost for Student Affairs Susie Brubaker-Cole on Stanford’s leave of absence policy

It’s undeniable that mental illness is a pressing issue on college campuses, especially at Stanford, where students are constantly pressured to succeed. It’s undeniable, too, that stigma against mental illness is a form of ableism — something that blames individuals for their struggles instead of attending to structural issues like a lack of accessibility to mental health resources. Which is why it’s so frustrating to learn that Stanford has made it a matter of institutional policy to treat students struggling with mental illness as security risks to be disciplined, and not as people with disabilities, worthy of respect. Through a gross misapplication of its Dean’s Leave of Absence policy, Stanford has evicted students from on-campus housing and barred them from campus for either expressing suicidal ideas or acting on suicidal thoughts, without regard to the facts of each individual’s case and the possible long-term impact of its actions on students’ health and recovery.

Ad campaign targets 700 incidences of potentially fatal infections at Stanford Hospital

As part of a campaign by a branch of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), an advertisement criticizing the Stanford Health Care (SHC) system is currently being broadcast on radio stations across the Bay Area. The ad primarily discusses above-average rates of patient infection at Stanford Hospital, although the larger campaign also addresses working conditions at the Hospital.

Hundreds of Stanford and local high school students rally for gun control

In the wake of the Feb. 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School (MSD) in Parkland, Florida that left 17 students and faculty members dead, survivors of the shooting galvanized a national movement demanding gun reform. Exactly one month later, on Wednesday March 14, students at Stanford and in Palo Alto joined others around the country in a nationwide walkout for gun control.