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Former professor, anti-war activist to return for book talk after controversial firing

H. Bruce Franklin, who garnered attention for his anti-war activism and protest of Stanford’s role in the Vietnam War, was controversially fired in 1972 for allegedly interfering with a police order and inciting students to “disrupt University functions.” Franklin’s new memoir, which he will discuss today, describes the country’s historical war tactics and their implications today.

The Time to Act was Yesterday: Private Institutions & Environmental Justice

Stanford, Harvard and Yale exist as examples of private educational institutions that are highly complicit in global processes of wealth and knowledge extraction, along with anti-indigenous and anti-black violence. The institution we currently attend sits on land violently stolen from Ohlone peoples, who were forced into involuntary labor and suffered enormous abuse and death during the Mission Era. After the civil war, U.S. Army soldiers were conscripted to “bounty-hunt” Native Peoples for the purposes of land theft. The primary architect of this California Genocide was Leland Stanford, who was the governor of California at the time. Leland Stanford not only supported legislation that made the California Genocide state-sanctioned, but he also personally recruited soldiers to join the army that would hunt Native Peoples. The land Stanford now sits upon was bought with wealth and power amassed by Leland Stanford’s exploitation of Native People. He built his fortune through the Central Pacific Railroad, the completion of which led to the increased flow of the U.S. army into Plains Tribes’ territory and the near-decimation of the buffalo, both of which had specifically disastrous effects for the Indigenous people of the Great Plains.

‘Rent plus Ramen equals stipend’: Twenty years later, Stanford’s graduate student crisis persists

In 1998, nearly one thousand Stanford graduate students staged a rally and camp-in protesting unaffordable campus housing options and financial insecurity. In the cold and rain of night, they pitched tents in the middle of Main Quad and covered them in signs that read, “Look Mom, no housing” and “Rent plus Ramen equals stipend.” Over 20 years later, the issues they raised continue to create significant hardship for many.