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The constant struggle of focusing on what matters

Each of these bills had the potential to provide some benefit to society – some corrected historical wrongs while others aimed to improve government functioning or enhance the lifestyle of certain subgroups. But are they important enough, impactful enough to make the 115th Congress’ top 400 enacted laws? Would you want your representative or party spending their political capital to pass them?

Music + X: Politics

From the earliest symphonies to operas made in the past decade, politics has been present in classical music — not only as a subject of composer’s interest, but as a force that shapes the music deemed worthy. Today, we consider two works of music: one by a Russian composer under the microscope of the 1920s Soviet Union, the other by an American composer given considerably more leeway to comment on American international politics of the 1970s.

If you don’t like SCR, come see Andrew Klavan

Many have criticized the Stanford College Republicans in recent years for being provocative at the expense of offering substance. Much of that criticism has taken place within the pages of this very newspaper. In anticipation of the Dinesh D’Souza event in February, Cole Griffiths wrote, “[D’Souza’s] invitation by the SCR is in bad faith, an…