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Op-Ed: The ASSU tries to chill free speech

This past week, the ASSU debated a bill authored by the Director of Academic Freedom, Zintis Inde, that would force every student club to include a mandatory 120-word statement on all advertisements for their event. A paragraph-long statement may have to be included in every email, flyer and Facebook post regarding a speaker your club brings in the future, if this bill passes. If a club forgets to include the statement just four times over the span of two years, it could receive a “one year ban on funding,” according to an early draft of the bill. The statement itself is pretty basic: it notes that the ASSU does not necessarily endorse the speakers it funds, while simultaneously supports the value of free speech in campus dialogue. Even if we set aside for the moment the ethics of compelling groups to include this lengthy statement, one must question the necessity of the requirement itself.

Foreign Policy in the United States

The United States faces an increasingly urgent challenge: reevaluating how we choose and implement foreign policy. Currently, our government’s approach to foreign policy is paradoxically too democratic and not democratic enough. Presidents’ decisions to use force are strongly influenced by electoral incentives, but citizens have few opportunities to directly influence a specific decision about the…

Letter to the Editor: On American socialism

It is about time that the American people were educated and informed about what true “Socialism” is and is not.  The fact is that in true socialism “the means of production” are owned by all of the people.  In other words, all of the workplaces and businesses are owned, controlled, and run by all of the people for the good and well-being of all of the people. They are not privately-owned by individuals and groups.  In true socialism, we would not be totally equal in terms of how much we would get paid for our work, but we would be much, much more equal than we are now.  There would not be any billionaires or people who have hundreds of millions of dollars and tens of millions of dollars in total wealth, most of which they inherited and did not earn by their own labor.  We would share what we have.