Support independent, student-run journalism.

Your support helps give staff members from all backgrounds the opportunity to conduct meaningful reporting on important issues at Stanford. All contributions are tax-deductible.

Instagram and Your Life Story

Every day, each of us faces a choice in how to think about our lives: do we manipulate the truth to make things seem better than they would otherwise, or do we live in light of complete honesty about our experiences, no matter the cost? Both options are compelling. On one hand, we feel a…

Taking the dusty DSLR off the shelf

My best friend’s house is exactly how you would expect a household of four artists’ children to be—littered in magazine clippings, replete with stacks of thrifted photo books and with not a single bare wall. Therefore, I wasn’t all that surprised to find two random DSLRs sitting in the corner of her room. I knew…

We Shot the War: Overseas Weekly in Vietnam shows the person behind the photo

At first glance, the new photography exhibit at the Herbert Hoover Memorial Exhibit Pavilion seems simple. White space is used consistently throughout the exhibit, the empty walls displaying only a few black and white photographs each. Two short films are projected in a makeshift theater tucked away in the corners of the Pavilion, and four wooden tables in the center of the room display photographs, letters, books, music scores and newspaper clippings, all dating back to the Vietnam War era.

This simplicity is the true beauty of the exhibit “We Shot the War: ‘Overseas Weekly’ in Vietnam.” The phrase “a picture is worth a thousand words” seems to be the central focus of this exhibit, each brutally human photograph speaking for itself. While walking through the exhibit, one can see that these pictures do not aim to show the violence of the war, but rather to highlight the lives of soldiers and citizens alike.