Support independent, student-run journalism.

Your support helps give staff members from all backgrounds the opportunity to conduct meaningful reporting on important issues at Stanford. All contributions are tax-deductible.

Committees give students a voice, but offer inconsistent influence

According to a Faculty Senate report, the University’s system of committees provides “the best place for effective student participation in the governance of the University.” While students can serve on more than 40 committees in total, dealing with issues as varied as investment responsibility and laboratory animal care, their influence is often inconsistent and incomplete.

Mark Lawrence approaches 50 years at KZSU

KZSU, Stanford’s student-run radio station, has served the Farm since 1947 and is home to a mix of students, faculty, alumni and community members almost as eclectic as the music it broadcasts over the airwaves. Although many station members come and go over the quarters, a select few stick around for years, or even decades. One of them is Mark Lawrence ’67, chief engineer of KZSU for 40 years and counting.

Spinning Stanford’s stories

Though the KZSU show is perhaps the most well-known component of the Stanford Storytelling Project, it is only one segment. Founded in 2007, the Stanford Storytelling Project was created by Willinhganz, who was a fellow with the Stanford Humanities Fund at the time. Realizing the public impact of programs such as NPR’s “This American Life,” Willihnganz received funding through the Hume Writing Center and the Continuing Studies Program and began to teach classes. In these classes, students focused on writing their own memoirs and on collecting stories from around campus. Soon however, the “story collecting” expanded beyond the courses.

La Sera, La Bella– Indie princess takes SF

On an intimate stage in San Francisco, indie music sweetheart Katy Goodman crooned, “Waiting to tell you I can’t ever be with you so run back to her, love, because it’s over now,” in her deceptively sweet voice, inspiring fervor in the hip, young and swaying crowd. Later in the set, she used the same siren voice to introduce a song about death, coating her new breakup album, “La Sera Sees the Light.”