Support independent, student-run journalism.

Your support helps give staff members from all backgrounds the opportunity to conduct meaningful reporting on important issues at Stanford. All contributions are tax-deductible.

Op-Ed: In defense of Beltane

James Baldwin often referred to European-Americans as “the people who think they are white.” I used to think this was some kind of riddle. What does he mean “think”? I’d love to be anything other than white, but people of color taught me to stay in my lane. It’s not a choice or belief; we are white. What would we be if we weren’t?

‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ brings Baldwin’s story to the screen

The Broadway composer Stephen Sondheim claimed that many musicals are failures because “their authors are blinded by the attractiveness of the source material,” but “they never ask themselves what music will do for the story that hasn’t already been accomplished by the original author.” Sondheim calls these works “why” musicals, because there’s no reason why…

‘The Breakfast Club’ is an antique analysis of adolescent anguish

Midway through John Hughes’ 1985 film “The Breakfast Club,” high school principal Richard Vernon has had enough. Vernon is tasked with supervising five students in Saturday detention, but one of them, John Bender, is particularly difficult to handle. After John insults Vernon for the umpteenth time, Vernon locks him in a storage closet. Vernon’s spiteful…

A perfect movie week? ‘The Red Turtle,’ ‘Personal Shopper,’ ‘I Am Not Your Negro’, ‘Song to Song,’ ‘Frantz’

In recent memory, has there been a more inspiring week for film? Think on it: Malick’s latest joint, Studio Ghibli is back, Kristen Stewart fights texting ghosts (and herself), and James Baldwin goes to the movies. All of these were released in the past week or two—not to mention the still-playing “Get Out,” “La La Land,” “Moonlight,” “The Salesman,” “Hidden…

Raoul Peck redefines the Civil Rights Movement in Oscar-nominated ‘I Am Not Your Negro’

At the time of his death in 1987, black writer and activist James Baldwin left an unfinished manuscript entitled “Remember This House” detailing his personal experiences of the deaths of Medgar Evers, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X. Now, nearly 30 years later, Raoul Peck brings this very manuscript to life with the Oscar-nominated…