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Golub: I’ve got to see a Warriors game

I’ve been thinking lately that I gotta go see a Warriors playoff game. Oracle Arena may be old by NBA standards, but it’s a booming, beautiful house of basketball. Plus, after this year when KD finds a new team, the Warriors dynasty will hopefully reach a merciful conclusion (Merciful to the rest of the league, that is; I hope they crash and burn and all hate each other and Draymond has to be held back from strangling someone). It’s my last chance to watch what will go down as one of the iconic teams in basketball history in one of the sport’s historic landmarks.

Tan: The NBA’s pre-agency problem

The 2018-19 NBA season, as has been the case since the beginning of the Golden State Warriors’ tyrannical reign over basketball, has been overall lackluster and uninteresting as the Warriors begin to round into form after supercharging their roster with a Demarcus Cousins sized battery to add a little Boogie to their splash. Once again, the regular season feels less like a compelling slate of matchups gradually revealing the quality of each team and more like a preamble to the inevitable desecration of the league by Golden State’s Voltron of a roster.

Golub: Trump’s antics bring power to athletes

A hallmark of the Trump presidency is its fear-based approach to governing.  Dangerous Muslim terrorists; corrupt, colluding fake news media; caravans of violent migrants coming to eat our children and curse our livestock, or something — evidently, Trump has no qualms with fomenting fear to advance his agenda.  (To debate another time: does he have an agenda?) As harmful as this Trump presidency may be, his strategy leans upon tried and true methods of political manipulation. One such example: McCarthyism.

Naidu: Not my World Series

This is not the World Series everybody wanted.  A matchup between the Boston Red Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers could not feature two more vintage blueblood franchises. The Dodgers haven’t won in three decades, but they’re still six-time World Series champions – they’re still the team that housed legends like Sandy Koufax, Pee Wee Reese and Jackie Robinson. The Red Sox are no stranger to the limelight and World Series rings either, winning five years ago, with three championships since the year 2000.

Naidu: My Mavericks

As a sports columnist for The Stanford Daily, I always try my best to cover material that piques the average Stanford sports reader’s interest. Thus, the diversity of Stanford’s student body means I must strive to cover timely topics that appeal to a variety of fan bases and sports.

Ziperski: LeBron’s greatest achievement

Prior to this season, LeBron James had won three NBA titles, three Finals MVP awards, four season MVP awards and two Olympic gold medals. He’s a fourteen-time All-Star and has been named to the All-NBA first team twelve times. Considered by many to be the greatest player of all time, he has accomplished truly unbelievable things over the course of fifteen-year career.

Rosas: A look back at the 2011 Thunder

Amid controversy surrounding the lack of fluidity between newly acquired superstar forward Kevin Durant and franchise legend Steph Curry, the Slim Reaper hosted to his prior franchise home, the Westbrook-led Oklahoma City Thunder. Despite valiant effort and yet another Westbrook triple-double, the overmatched Thunder fell by the wayside in Oakland, falling victim to yet another Warriors blowout, 121-100.