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In ASSU executive debate, slates disagree on undergraduate representation on Title IX panels, methods of enacting change

On Sunday, Apr. 8, two of the three executive slates running for the 2018-2019 ASSU presidency and vice presidency participated in a debate co-hosted by The Stanford Daily and KZSU. Shanta Katipamula ’19 and Ph.D. candidate Rosie Nelson (the Shanta-Rosie slate) debated Khaled Aounallah ’19 and Michael Ocon ’20 (the Khaled-Ocon slate) for approximately an hour while KZSU’s Caleb Smith ’17 M.A. ’18 and The Daily’s Yasmin Samrai ’21 moderated.

Board of Judicial Affairs rejects proposal to add “veteran status” to Fundamental Standard

On Feb. 18, Stanford’s Board of Judicial Affairs declined to add military affiliation to the list of identities — including race, gender, socioeconomic status and more — explicitly protected under the Fundamental Standard. The University decision followed a request for the change nearly six months prior by Adam Behrendt ’19, president of the Stanford Undergraduate Veteran Association.

Humor and responsibility

This responsibility to know the difference between offense and harm becomes more complicated when we leave the world of professional comedy for Stanford, but using this framework of determining who is the target of a joke is useful. Use humor in art or entertainment responsibly, and think before crossing the line of controversy and offense into more hurtful territory.

Are we Charlie? A brief history of free speech at Stanford

But if we are to honor the legacy of Charlie Hebdo on campus, let us do so by discussing the state of free speech at Stanford, and by welcoming those with whom we disagree to campus with open arms and discerning minds. The value of this approach was made clear when the Westboro Baptist Church came to Stanford to preach its message of intolerance and Stanford responded by coming together to peacefully oppose the group. Only if we resolve to continue and improve Stanford’s commitment to free speech can we rightfully tweet, “je suis Charlie.”