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Op-Ed: In support of Erica and Isaiah

If there is one thing that I walked away from my 19th Undergraduate Senate experience knowing for certain, it is that Stanford’s administration (President, Provost, Vice Provosts and their staff) requires student leaders who are willing to work collaboratively within existing systems to make change happen. This is not to say that existing systems should remain or that activism does not have a place in the ASSU, but rather that the most sustainable and lasting change comes about when students are able to bridge the gap between themselves and the administration. It is no coincidence that some of the movements that we have seen during the last years at Stanford have stalled while others, like the Serra-renaming, have moved forward. Activism is central to change on Stanford’s campus, especially as evidenced by SCOPE 2035 in the GUP process. However, the most effective models of leadership I have seen have been centered around a model in which the ASSU representatives have a different role than the activists: that of active student-administration collaboration within the university’s channels.

Video: WonderCon Anaheim 2018 interviews with award-winning composers, designers and actors

At WonderCon Anaheim 2018, the Stanford Daily had the opportunity to interview a wide variety of industry professionals. The following roundtable interviews were performed and recorded: 1. Ariela Barer and Emily Coutts (actors, Marvel’s “Runaways” and “Star Trek: Discovery,” respectively) 2. Sean Callery (Four-time Emmy Award-winning composer, “Jessica Jones,” “Homeland,” “Elementary,” “24”) 3. Ruth Carter…

Q&A: Recently-elected ASSU Executives Shanta Katipamula and Rosie Nelson

On April 14th, the Associated Students of Stanford University (ASSU) elections commission announced that Shanta Katipamula ’19 and Graduate School of Education Ph.D. candidate Rosie Nelson would be the next executives of the ASSU for the 2018-2019 academic year. Katipamula and Nelson comprised the second undergraduate-graduate slate in ASSU history.

The Shanta-Rosie slate won 61.92 percent of the vote, more than twice as much as the second place slate, which earned 27.3 percent. The winners made connecting undergraduate and graduate students a central component of their platform.

In ASSU executive debate, slates disagree on undergraduate representation on Title IX panels, methods of enacting change

On Sunday, Apr. 8, two of the three executive slates running for the 2018-2019 ASSU presidency and vice presidency participated in a debate co-hosted by The Stanford Daily and KZSU. Shanta Katipamula ’19 and Ph.D. candidate Rosie Nelson (the Shanta-Rosie slate) debated Khaled Aounallah ’19 and Michael Ocon ’20 (the Khaled-Ocon slate) for approximately an hour while KZSU’s Caleb Smith ’17 M.A. ’18 and The Daily’s Yasmin Samrai ’21 moderated.