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Pluralism and politics: An optimistic hypothesis

In just a few days, winter quarter will be a fading memory and I will be on a plane to Washington, D.C.—the spring break destination of every Political Science major’s dreams. Over a year ago, my close friend Eliza Steffen ’20 and I decided to apply to lead a brand-new class for Alternative Spring Break (ASB), a program that offers a variety of intensive service-learning trips centered on a particular issue area or community experience. By integrating some of our favorite Political Science coursework with insights from advocacy experiences in our own faith communities, we sketched out an aspirational syllabus and itinerary for “Pluralism and Politics: Exploring Faith-Based Advocacy in American Society. ” To our pleasant surprise, the ASB team took a chance on our brainchild; a Google Doc that we’d dreamed up during spring break 2018 was to become a 1-unit course and weeklong trip for up to a dozen students.

‘Promised Land’: Jacob Lawrence and the African American experience

“Promised Land: Jacob Lawrence at the Cantor, A Gift from the Kayden Family” showcases a diversity of works by Jacob Lawrence, one of the most prominent voices in the artistic portrayal of the African American experience. This diversity is seen in the mediums Lawrence experimented with, the various paintbrush and pencil styles he used and the number of pieces in each series of work. All these are strung together by the appearance of the black African American.

Limitations of identity activism

Challenges lie ahead for today’s activists who still balk at the possibility of initiating unexpected alliances. The sectionalistic few who prefer to lob slogans like “check your privilege” instead of making sincere attempts to ally with their opponents could benefit from a nugget of Putnam’s wisdom. “A society of many virtuous but isolated individuals is not necessarily rich in social capital.”