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Naidu: Not my World Series

This is not the World Series everybody wanted.  A matchup between the Boston Red Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers could not feature two more vintage blueblood franchises. The Dodgers haven’t won in three decades, but they’re still six-time World Series champions – they’re still the team that housed legends like Sandy Koufax, Pee Wee Reese and Jackie Robinson. The Red Sox are no stranger to the limelight and World Series rings either, winning five years ago, with three championships since the year 2000.

Pragada: Major League Baseball is back

I’m writing this column while sitting behind home plate at the Stanford-UC Davis baseball game, and despite the excellent pitching of Brendan Beck and the productivity of the Cardinal bats, I can’t take my eyes off of my computer screen, where I’ve got the first Yankees-Red Sox game of the year pulled up on a questionably legal streaming website. And wouldn’t you know it, just as I was drafting that last sentence, Mookie Betts just crushed a grand slam right over the Green Monster to put the Sox up 14-1. And if you were wondering if I’m overjoyed or upset at that outcome, I’ve been a massive Red Sox fan since I was 10 years old. Seeing the Yankees get smashed is pure ecstasy. But even so, I’ve got to sit back and ask myself, why am I actually watching Major League Baseball?

Shi: Baseball seeks vengeance in a hallowed ground

Boston’s Fenway Park is deceptively small. You can spend four years watching the Red Sox on NESN (or, if they’re playing the Yankees, ESPN), and you’d get the decided impression that Fenway is a typical baseball stadium. Perhaps a low-capacity one, but still built on the gargantuan scale of such behemoths as Dodger Stadium or the Oakland Coliseum — spacious arenas built in a spacious country.