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Stanford College Republicans navigate Trump, friction with mainstream liberalism and their own future

Although Stanford’s undergraduate population tends towards the Democratic party, the University is not without its conservative tendencies. The Stanford Review was co-founded over 30 years ago by venture capitalist and conservative philanthropist Peter Thiel; resident think tank the Hoover Institution once included Secretary of Defense James Mattis and National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster among its fellows. The Stanford College Republicans (SCR), meanwhile, has traditionally kept a low profile, but the last several months have seen the group put more effort into engaging the student body.

Hundreds of Stanford and local high school students rally for gun control

In the wake of the Feb. 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School (MSD) in Parkland, Florida that left 17 students and faculty members dead, survivors of the shooting galvanized a national movement demanding gun reform. Exactly one month later, on Wednesday March 14, students at Stanford and in Palo Alto joined others around the country in a nationwide walkout for gun control.

Palo Alto protesters demand Lytton Plaza renaming in ‘#NameHerToo’ campaign

Thursday evening, protesters gathered at Lytton Plaza in downtown Palo Alto to advocate for its renaming as part of the “#NameHerToo” campaign and in coordination with International Women’s Day. The campaign is a response to the fact that while 27 streets in Palo Alto are named after male writers, none are named for female writers, according to the event’s co-organizer Patricia Martín Rivas.

Controversial Cardinal Conversations speaker Murray sparks peaceful anti-racist rally

Controversial social scientist Charles Murray and Freeman Spogli Institute senior fellow Francis Fukuyama discussed inequality and populism at the Hoover Institute on Thursday night in the second of four Cardinal Conversations, a program that aims to promote open political discourse on campus.

The event had visibly low attendance, with most of the back segment — around 100 seats — of the 400-person auditorium unfilled. Towards the front of the room, multiple reserved seats were left empty, as were several in the first row.

Meanwhile, across the street at the History Corner, “Take Back The Mic” counter-programming protested Murray and statements he has made regarding the relationship between class, race and intelligence.