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Are Democratic candidates addressing climate change in a productive manner?

Now more than ever, climate debates need to be brought to the forefront of political campaigns and races. The Democratic candidates must be the ones to make this issue their priority in the 2020 presidential race. Not until climate activists publicly attacked the debates for giving too little time to climate change did CNN finally host a seven hour town hall debate in September, centered on candidate plans for climate change.

Golub: The price of imparity

The Anthony Davis saga has me confused.  On the one hand, I’m mad that he requested a trade.  I don’t want him to go to the Lakers, I don’t want LeBron to manipulate the whole league, I don’t want the Pelicans to have to give up their best player in franchise history, and I don’t want AD to give up on the Pelicans.  On the other, it’s about damn time. Since the year after they drafted him, the Pels have consistently made short-sighted, risky moves that lowered the ceiling and didn’t even make them that good in the present. They have given no indication to anyone that they will build a championship-caliber team around Davis and Jrue Holiday (who, by the way, is the biggest victim here).  Should Davis waste his prime hoping that they get lucky and stumble into a Western Conference Finals appearance? No. He shouldn’t. Davis is the product of a new era of player control and player movement, an era that is changing how teams build their rosters and how fans think about their teams. This new age of player movement is killing league parity and – here’s the fun part – can also explain the political polarization of our country.  Let’s begin.