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Op-Ed: Graduate students on SUP’s future

We are doctoral students in the humanities and social sciences, and we are writing to express our unwavering support for the continued, renewable funding of Stanford University Press and the establishment of a major endowment such as that of Harvard and Princeton University Presses. We strongly believe that SUP should be a necessary item in Stanford’s budget, just as our Ivy League peer institutions have done with their own academic presses.

Op-Ed: Save Stanford’s world-class press

I am writing to you as a scholar of the Holocaust and as a two-time Stanford University Press author. I was distressed to read this past week in various news sources that you plan to significantly cut support for the press. According to those who work closely with SUP, this cut could lead to the demise of one of the nation’s premier outlets for academic scholarship. It is difficult for me to understand how one of the world’s richest educational institutions could be so shortsighted as to risk such a dire outcome, even in a budget year that you have described as “tight.” I am writing in the hope that you can still be convinced to reverse this misguided decision and save the reputation of your university.

Banning Dissection: Where California Goes, So Goes the Nation

In 1987, Jennifer Graham, a 15-year old California high school student, refused to dissect a frog because she believed doing so would be immoral. She asked her teacher for an alternative assignment, but her request was denied and her grade suffered. Jennifer sued the school district, claiming that requiring dissection violated her First Amendment right to her deeply held religious and moral beliefs. A year later, California’s education code was amended, giving all California K-12 public school students the right to refrain from dissection and to be given an alternative assignment without penalty.