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Op-Ed: In support of Erica and Isaiah

If there is one thing that I walked away from my 19th Undergraduate Senate experience knowing for certain, it is that Stanford’s administration (President, Provost, Vice Provosts and their staff) requires student leaders who are willing to work collaboratively within existing systems to make change happen. This is not to say that existing systems should remain or that activism does not have a place in the ASSU, but rather that the most sustainable and lasting change comes about when students are able to bridge the gap between themselves and the administration. It is no coincidence that some of the movements that we have seen during the last years at Stanford have stalled while others, like the Serra-renaming, have moved forward. Activism is central to change on Stanford’s campus, especially as evidenced by SCOPE 2035 in the GUP process. However, the most effective models of leadership I have seen have been centered around a model in which the ASSU representatives have a different role than the activists: that of active student-administration collaboration within the university’s channels.

Op-Ed: Kimiko and Bryce can get things done

I first met Kimiko at a meeting for the Students for the Liberation of All People, also affectionately known as SLAP. I came to know her as a dedicated activist, fighting for marginalized communities within Stanford and beyond the confines of campus. I met Bryce freshman year in my ESF seminar where I saw him be willing and unafraid to speak up for the things that were important to him. Over my past few years at Stanford, I have been able to witness both Kimiko and Bryce grow and develop into prominent change makers on campus. Based on their past successes, I firmly believe they will substantially improve the student experience at Stanford and address the concerns of Stanford’s most underserved communities. Simply put, Kimiko and Bryce know how to get things done, and that is why I am voting for them as ASSU Execs.

Why we support ASSU constitutional reform

As members of the Associated Students of Stanford University (ASSU) all undergraduate and graduate students at Stanford play crucial roles in improving student life and supporting student organizations on campus. The legislative bodies of the ASSU—the Undergraduate Senate and Graduate Student Council—are dedicated to being conscientious stewards of student trust and funds. Moreover, all branches of the ASSU are committed to ensuring sound and transparent student government policies and practices. In pursuit of these objectives, ASSU leadership launched a project team last Spring comprised of members of each major ASSU branch. We, the ASSU Constitutional Reform Project Team, have drafted five Constitutional reforms over the past year that will be placed on the 2019 Spring Election ballot that we strongly encourage you to support.

Op-Ed: ResEd can do better

It was the night of Eurotrash, and I had the “misfortune” of being on-call while my residents experienced their first college party. One minute, I was ordering DoorDash in the lounge; the next, I was sprinting towards the Row with a backpack full of water. All I knew was that a resident needed help. When I arrived on the Row, I saw an unfortunately familiar sight: incredibly intoxicated, semi-conscious students, most surrounded by friends, but others completely alone. Yet familiarity is different than preparedness. At that moment, it became clear that I was not given the resources to deal with this. In fact, none of us were.

Kimiko Hirota and Bryce Tuttle for ASSU Exec

There is no one else I can imagine that is more qualified, dedicated and poised to fill the roles of ASSU Exec than Kimiko Hirota and Bryce Tuttle. Kimiko and Bryce have demonstrated a continuous record of advocacy for marginalized communities on campus, including students of color, first-generation and/or low-income students, and students with disabilities.…

Op-Ed: In defense of Beltane

James Baldwin often referred to European-Americans as “the people who think they are white.” I used to think this was some kind of riddle. What does he mean “think”? I’d love to be anything other than white, but people of color taught me to stay in my lane. It’s not a choice or belief; we are white. What would we be if we weren’t?