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Gracie Newman

‘Less’-ons: An interview with Andrew Sean Greer, Part 2

Continuing from yesterday’s paper, this article is Part 2 of staff writer Gracie Newman’s interview with Andrew Sean Greer, who is the author of “Less” (the 2018 winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction) and numerous other novels and short stories. “Less” is a comedic romance that follows a middle-aged writer as he travels the…

‘Less’-ons: An interview with Andrew Sean Greer, Part 1

Staff writer Gracie Newman interviewed Andrew Sean Greer, who is the author of “Less” (the 2018 winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction) and numerous other novels and short stories. “Less” is a comedic romance that follows a middle-aged writer as he travels the world in an attempt to avoid attending the wedding of the…

Marked bodies and the popularity of literary tattoos

Tattoos have marked human bodies since the Neolithic period. Their permanence bares a heavy weight. Each needle scrawls a different story, whether it be a drunken mistake or a solemn tribute. And yet, tattoos also represent a distinctive sort of vitality; our bones will bear no traces of the ink and the sentiments of the…

Dirty realism: Authenticity in the 20th century

I like dirty realism because it reeks of authenticity. Although I breathe for for the glorious intellectual rabbit holes of David Foster Wallace and John Barth, I don’t always have the energy for prolific footnotes or existential crises. When the sly literary winks aren’t doing it for me, I turn to stories with a little…

Warmth in Karl Ove Knausgård’s ‘Autumn’

Reading Karl Ove Knausgård’s newest book, “Autumn,” is like drinking warm milk with honey on a chilly night. Each page is thick and dense and sweet. It’s a far cry from his previous work, which might be best characterized as a rich, peppery shot of whiskey (or six). In this epistolary masterpiece, Knausgård builds sweet…
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