The Daily stands in solidarity with the Black community. Read our editors’ statement.
Eric Huang
Eric Huang is a junior at Stanford University hailing from Irvine, California. An aspiring computer science major and art practice minor, Eric's passion for visual arts manifests itself not only in his practice, but also in his writing. To contact Eric, shoot him an email: [email protected]

‘Object Lessons’: A crash course in modern Chinese brush painting

The Cantor Arts Center is currently featuring a series of exhibitions entitled “Object Lessons: Art & Its Histories,” which is organized around foundational art history courses at Stanford. The exhibits seek to transform the gallery space into a hub for academic discussion and critical thinking about visual art and its cultural contexts. “Object Lessons,” as…

‘New to the Cantor’ packs a visual punch

The recently opened “New to the Cantor” features some of the most iconic contemporary and modern pieces from the collection, as well as artists who have never been exhibited at the museum before. Together, these elements combine to form one of the most impactful, visually diverse exhibits I’ve seen during my time at Stanford. “New…

Cantor Arts Center gears up for the fall

With the new academic year out in full force, the Cantor Arts Center is gearing up for a slew of exhibits to be released in the coming months. Displayed alongside ongoing exhibits such as the previously reviewed “Showing Off,” these upcoming shows range from collections of iconic modern art pieces to the more contemporary and…

In conversation: Barbara Kruger and Alexander Nemerov

On the evening of May 16, Barbara Kruger and Alexander Nemerov graced the stage of Cemex Auditorium with a discussion about Kruger’s work and its social implications. The talk is a part of The Ethics of Democracy Series, a program whose goal is to analyze the ethics of democracy from the perspective of scholars and…

‘Mark These Cradles’: An out-of-body experience

“Mark These Cradles,” currently on view at the McMurtry Building’s Moghadam Gallery, is a solo exhibition featuring the work of Studio Art major Maia Paroginog. An opening reception for “Mark These Cradles” was held at the McMurtry Building on April 22. The exhibit is part of the Department of Art & Art History honors program,…

‘Figuration/Abstraction’ features Cantor’s best

“Figuration/Abstraction” is built on the notion of opposites, pitting representational art and painstaking realism against the whimsical, open-ended aesthetic of abstraction. The exhibit highlights works from the Cantor’s permanent collection, sprawling across the walls of the expansive Freidenrich Family Gallery. The exhibit asks us to note the stylistic differences between the works as well as the…

‘Showing Off’: Exploring East Asian threads

The experience of viewing “Showing Off” is surreal, like stepping into a giant time capsule. “Showing Off” explores how the design language of East Asian cultures translates to fashion by flaunting an incredible collection of East Asian garments from antiquity. It is especially interesting to note the similarities between garments across different cultures as well…

‘Myth, Allegory and Faith’: The body as narrative

“Myth, Allegory and Faith” traces the rise of Mannerism, the dominant artistic style in 16th century Europe. Mannerist art usually takes the form of engravings, etchings, woodcuts and chiaroscuro woodcuts, often sporting religious and historical undertones. Mannerism first disseminated from Renaissance Florence and Rome – a hub for masters of illustration and figuration – to France,…

‘Bird in the Hand’: A flurry of feathers

Featuring a motley collection of paintings, sculptures and on-site installations, “Bird in the Hand” is a new exhibit at the nearby Palo Alto Art Center that plays on the human fascination with birds and aviation. The exhibit focuses on birds as vehicles for cultural expression and as subjects of fascination for artists. The most captivating…

‘Wanting More’: Reflecting on consumer culture

During an era when pop art and consumer culture dominated the American art scene, photography emerged as a means of both artistic expression and cultural criticism. “Wanting More,” a newly opened exhibit at the Cantor Arts Center, is an unassuming but conceptually powerful exposé of consumer culture in America in the mid-20th century. The exhibit…

Top five upcoming on-campus exhibits

Following up a strong 2015 lineup of exhibitions, from “Artists at Work” to “We’re Not in the Business of Warehousing Paper,” students and faculty in Stanford’s art department look to continue brandishing the talent and diversity of the arts scene at Stanford in 2016. Continuing exhibitions include the recently-reviewed “Empathy,” “Missing Persons” and “Words as…

Studio art faculty talk: Chagoya discusses process

This past Wednesday, as part of programming for the Cantor exhibition “Artists at Work,” Enrique Chagoya, a celebrated professor in Stanford’s Department of Art and Art History, gave a talk at the Cantor Arts Center discussing his own influences and artistic process. Drawing from his experience living in and out of Mexico and from his…

Authors of ‘Electric Fashion’ talk creativity

This past Wednesday, Frederic Aranda — a celebrated fashion photographer and regular contributor to publications like Vogue and GQ — and Christine Suppes– a garment collector and founder of fashionlines.com — gave a talk at the Stanford Bookstore regarding their recent publication “Electric Fashion.” The book, touted as an incredible photographic accomplishment, is an anthology of photographs…

Gabe Haro: More than just a meme

Gabe Haro ’18 is a maker. A modern-day Renaissance man, Haro, often seen sporting paint-spattered pants and his signature two-tone hairstyle, dabbles in fields ranging from photo manipulation to mechanical engineering. In his art, Haro strives to marry his diverse interests, exploring the unique visual qualities of digital media, mechanics and technology. More of a…

Rare Piranesi drawings revive Greek architecture

In 1777, Italian printmaker and architect Giovanni Battista Piranesi visited the ancient Greek city of Paestum on the Gulf of Salerno, creating a series of studies focusing on three Doric temples in the city. “Piranesi’s Paestum,” currently on view at the Cantor Arts Center, displays some of Piranesi’s rare preparatory drawings and sketches from the…

“Front Yard/Backstreet” frames cityscapes as fine art

“Front Yard/Backstreet,” is a new exhibit at the Palo Alto Art Center that attempts to re-contextualize the places where we work and live as networks of complex visuals. The exhibit explores the connection between people and their environment, while using the themes of maps and landscapes as the basis for the works on display. Here,…

Diebenkorn’s sketchbooks revealed to the public

“Richard Diebenkorn: The Sketchbooks Revealed” is the first ever public viewing of California-based artist and Stanford alum Richard Diebenkorn’s personal sketchbooks. The Cantor Arts Center has successfully digitized all 29 of his sketchbooks, which are arranged chronologically and accessible at the exhibit itself via touchscreen display. Known for toting a sketchbook everywhere he went, Diebenkorn studied…

‘Artists at Work’: Peering into the artist mind

Currently on view at the Cantor Arts Center, “Artists at Work” pays homage to the McMurtry Building for Art and Art History, blending lessons of art history with those of contemporary art practice.  Featuring the works of American and European artists such as Édouard Manet, J. M. W. Turner and Thomas Hart Benton, the exhibition…

McMurtry Building inspires new exhibitions

To kick off the new school year and to mark the opening of the McMurtry Building for Art and Art History, the Cantor Arts Center will be featuring two new major exhibitions: “Artists at Work” and “Piranesi’s Paestum: Master Drawings Uncovered.” By highlighting prolific artists from the Western world, the exhibitions celebrate not only the practices…

Cantor showcases the work of Italian masters

“500 Years of Italian Master Drawings from the Princeton University Art Museum,” currently on view at the Cantor Arts Center, features nearly 100 Italian artworks from the 15th to 20th century and is the first major exhibition devoted to the collection since the 1960s. The exhibit traces the origins of disegno – drawing – as the foundation for architecture, sculpture and painting, displaying a range of works from elaborate compositions to loosely rendered studies.

‘We’re Not in the Business of Warehousing Paper’: MFA students showcase large-scale works

Currently on view at the Stanford Art Gallery, “We’re Not in the Business of Warehousing Paper” is an MFA thesis exhibition showcasing works from five art practice MFA students: Einat Imber, Christopher Nickel, Felicita Norris, Daniela Rossell, and Lauren Ashley Toomer. The exhibition is a melting pot, featuring ideas across different forms and media to address issues ranging from global communications to psychological boundaries. Process-wise, the works focus particularly on the materiality and texture of cloth, paper and other such surfaces. The aesthetic of the exhibit is as much about materials as it is about the drawings and paintings themselves.

‘Spirits on Forest’: Philz Coffee becomes a colorful jungle

“Spirits on Forest,” an exhibition of work by Bay Area art collective Animal Spirit Design, is currently on view at Philz Coffee on Forest Avenue. This past Friday, the café hosted an opening party for the exhibition, where the artists behind the work were available to introduce their illustrations to art enthusiasts and coffee-lovers alike. The works on display feature a range of stylized, contemporary renditions of various wildlife.

‘The Continuing Allure of Hayao Miyazaki’: Celebrating Japanese pop culture

This past Wednesday, The Graphic Narrative Project, Stanford Humanities Center and the Center for East Asian Studies hosted a talk about the worldwide appeal of legendary Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki. Miyazaki and his works have evolved into pop culture phenomena not only in Japan, but also in the west, boasting a slew of iconic, enormously popular characters. The two guest speakers, Frederik L. Schodt and Beth Cary, are the translators behind “Starting Point: 1979-1996” and “Turning Point: 1997-2008,” two volumes of compiled interviews and essays by Miyazaki himself. While translating these works, the duo explored the different facets of Miyazaki’s persona and connected them with the themes portrayed in his animated works.

‘Arboreal Architecture’: Exploring the visual history of trees

“Arboreal Architecture” is a new Cantor exhibition that characterizes trees as evocative subjects and as architects of human thought. The exhibit traces the artistic representation of trees across time and between various cultures. Trees are used as a metaphor for the knowledge structures that constitute our understanding of the world and as a mode of highlighting cultural differences.
Load more