Support independent, student-run journalism.

Your support helps give staff members from all backgrounds the opportunity to conduct meaningful reporting on important issues at Stanford. All contributions are tax-deductible.

‘Object Lessons’: A crash course in modern Chinese brush painting

The Cantor Arts Center is currently featuring a series of exhibitions entitled “Object Lessons: Art & Its Histories,” which is organized around foundational art history courses at Stanford. The exhibits seek to transform the gallery space into a hub for academic discussion and critical thinking about visual art and its cultural contexts. “Object Lessons,” as…

‘Figuration/Abstraction’ features Cantor’s best

“Figuration/Abstraction” is built on the notion of opposites, pitting representational art and painstaking realism against the whimsical, open-ended aesthetic of abstraction. The exhibit highlights works from the Cantor’s permanent collection, sprawling across the walls of the expansive Freidenrich Family Gallery. The exhibit asks us to note the stylistic differences between the works as well as the…

‘Myth, Allegory and Faith’: The body as narrative

“Myth, Allegory and Faith” traces the rise of Mannerism, the dominant artistic style in 16th century Europe. Mannerist art usually takes the form of engravings, etchings, woodcuts and chiaroscuro woodcuts, often sporting religious and historical undertones. Mannerism first disseminated from Renaissance Florence and Rome – a hub for masters of illustration and figuration – to France,…