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Emma Heath
Emma Heath — when not interrupting herself unnecessarily — is an English major. Her long term goals include finding the perfect banana-peanut butter ratio and continuing to read books with pretty words.

William Blake and Yayoi Kusama: Endless Myth

The Structure of Mythological Revolutions

When I walked into the screening of the movie “Kusama – Infinity,” a handful of people were already there, gathered on the green couches of FloMo, eyes glued to the screen. They were all familiar faces, except for the one woman in the corner, about my mom’s age—wearing casual khakis, and a serious expression as…

Visions of Elio

“Call Me By Your Name,” from the rippling contours of ancient statues’ triceps to the hazy pastels of Elio’s favorite boardshorts, is an aesthetic experience. And that’s exactly what critic D.A. Muller of the LA Review of Books dislikes.

Reading trees

“Do you know what the California state tree is?” I am standing with Sairus Patel in the little arboretum between the Law Library and the bookstore. Sairus is a typographer for Adobe with grey hair and a gentle smile. He’s also a tree enthusiast. He’s explaining to me the difference between the three types of…

Great writers, bad readers

Content warning: This article discusses rape and sexual abuse. Over winter break, I picked up JM Coetzee’s “Late Essays” in a San Francisco bookstore. In it I encountered one of two misreadings by authors — male writers I adore — that gently sidestepped what seemed to me to be glaring depictions of sexual assault. Coetzee’s first review…

The promise of ‘Bliss’

Let me introduce you to Bertha. Bertha is a young woman living the 1910s and she’s feeling – well, what is it exactly? Like skipping? Like shouting? A feeling of “bliss”? But no, she can’t quite say. Bertha, for the first of many times in her 33 pages as the protagonist of Katherine Mansfield’s “Bliss,” can’t…

SparkNoting the irreducible: Nabokov in translation

I recently found myself in a conversation with a friend, who upon reading the online summaries of Vladimir Nabokov’s “Speak, Memory,” deemed them insufficient to match her experience with the text. As an English major and thus deep believer in the power of summary to convey the complexities of the narrative experience, I took this…

Finding an unexpected home in ‘Frankenstein’

It’s October, and “Frankenstein” is in the air. Not quite literally (though I did throw my book up in celebration upon finishing it just in time for section), but as the 200th year anniversary of the book’s 1818 publication approaches, people are talking about the classic horror story. Truly novel at its time, “Frankenstein” was written…
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