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As TDX pushes back against Uni. decision to revoke housing, other Greek orgs consider the future of housed groups

As of late Monday night, the Theta Delta Chi (TDX) fraternity has gathered over 700 signatures on its campus-wide petition, originally released Sunday evening. The petition opposes to the University’s decision to remove the fraternity’s housing, the first in which consecutive failed conduct reviews — under the “Standards of Excellence” (SOE) evaluation system —  directly resulted in the loss of fraternity housing.

TDX fraternity to lose housing

The Theta Delta Chi (TDX) fraternity will lose its housing at the end of this school year, after the University found for the fourth year in a row that the group “needs improvements” to meet Stanford’s “Standards of Excellence” (SOE) governing reviews of Greek organizations. The fraternity plans to appeal the decision, and will receive a final outcome from Residential Education (ResEd) by Feb. 1.

NYT Executive Editor: ‘Hear from other thoughtful voices even if you disagree with them’

Executive Editor of the New York Times Dean Baquet has held the newsroom’s highest ranking position since 2014, where he has overseen coverage of content ranging from President Donald Trump’s Russia controversy to reporting on Harvey Weinstein and the #MeToo movement. On Tuesday night, Baquet addressed audience members in Cubberley Auditorium as part of an event hosted by the Brown Institute for Media Innovation. Prior to the event, he also sat down to speak to The Daily about Stanford’s open-mindedness to differing viewpoints, the New York Times’ coverage of Trump and how technology is changing the journalism field.

Brain folding sheds light on neurological diseases, researchers find

It may seem unlikely that studying the mechanics of concrete would inform brain research. However, Ellen Kuhl, mechanical engineering professor and head researcher for the Living Matter Lab, started out studying the molecular interactions of concrete and is now applying this understanding to the field of neuroscience, where her research has led to groundbreaking discoveries about neurological disorders.