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Cara Reichard

MOOCs face challenges in teaching humanities

Even as massive open online courses (MOOCs) continue to assume an increasingly prominent role in education, regularly enrolling thousands of students from around the world in classes taught by professors from dozens of universities, their rapid growth has sparked a backlash focused on the potential loss of diversity and interaction in education.

Overseas Seminars here to stay, after hiatus

The Bing Overseas Studies Program’s (BOSP) newly reintroduced Stanford Overseas Seminars are here to stay, according to Naoko Sakata, BOSP external programs coordinator. “We are scheduled to offer seminars for foreseeable future years,” Sakata wrote in an email to The Daily. According to Sakata, funding has been approved for the eight 2013 summer seminars in…

Stanford soulmates

Of the many Stanford myths repeated to freshmen, one of the most common is that up to 70 percent of Stanford students meet their life partners at the Farm. According to the Stanford Alumni Association and as reported by The Daily , in fact no more than 15 to 20 percent of Stanford students marry fellow trees. The Daily spoke with Stanford couples of all ages about romance on the Farm.

Re-evaluating writing: 10 years later

Most Stanford students are familiar with the Hume Writing Center (HWC). As a hotspot for freshmen struggling with Introduction to the Humanities (IHUM) assignments as well as graduate students plugging away at their dissertations, the Center seems to be going strong as it celebrates the tenth anniversary of its opening.

Cyberschool

The Stanford Online High School (OHS), previously called the Education Program for Gifted Youth (EPGY), was established in 2006 and currently serves more than 400 students, including both full- and part-time students.

Picturing nature

One Saturday morning this fall, a cluster of Stanford students stood, knelt and crouched with cameras strapped around their necks, exploring the California redwoods. They peered down into the grass and up the enormous trunks in search of the perfect photo -- and for students enrolled in the sophomore seminar “Photographing Nature” fall quarter, this was just a typical day in the classroom.
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