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Brady Hamed

Reviews: ‘The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel’

While I hate to paraphrase Dame Judi Dench at the end of “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel,” her character notes in her “e-lec-tronic” blog that sometimes success is measured by how you cope with failure. Following her mantra, the audience will surely have to test themselves and succeed admirably.

Preview: ‘City of Angels’

Ram’s Head’s spring musical production in recent years has been largely about putting on formidable versions of recognizable shows that everyone can enjoy. This year, the board made a decision to choose something riskier, something less famous: the 1989 musical comedy “City of Angels,” written by Cy Coleman, David Zippel and Larry Gelbart. This risk paid off well for the company.

Billy Crystal Returns for the 84th Academy Awards

The highlight of the film year has officially passed. After months of period dramas and auteur-directed, highfalutin movies—not to mention the never-ending parade of meaningless award shows—the big one has come and gone. This year, like always, the Academy Awards wrapped up the year rather predictably, but with a class and panache reserved only for the Oscars.

Networks debut midseason lineups

As 2012 kicks off, we are presented with the gift of midseason premieres. Just a couple of years ago, the midseason was a wasteland for awful TV shows that networks were forced to air in place of their other awful cancelled shows. However, with several midseason successes each year, running from “Seinfeld” to last year’s hidden gem “Happy Endings,” there are always a couple of diamonds in the rough that turn out to be truly wonderful shows worth watching.

Second opinion: Best movies of 2011

This has been a year for daring movies, and the best of them have all been movies that I feel like I’ve never seen before. If someone had told me the best films this year would include a Martin Scorsese children’s movie and a comedy about cancer, I wouldn’t have believed either could even get made. Fortunately my instincts were wrong, and we have some new movies to treasure for years to come.

Review: ‘The Muppets’

If you hate smiling, laughing, giggling, singing, dancing and all around joy, then maybe you should avoid “The Muppets.” However, if you want to smile, spend some time with everyone’s favorite puppets and sing along.

Review: “Dream House”

As the Halloween season begins, the time has come to cozy up in the movie theater with a big box of popcorn and a hand to hold during the scary parts of the thrillers that have become a seasonal treat. Fortunately, there is a new horror movie each weekend to frighten and delight. Sadly, "Dream House" is not one of those delightful flicks

Cannes: ‘Martha Marcy May Marlene’ review

The construction of the movie, constantly jumping back and forth between the cult family and her real life family is meticulously written. Each scene informs the next, as the audience gets drawn deeper down into the emotional rabbit hole of Martha's psyche in one of the most thrilling and unexpected movies of the year.

The glitz, the glamour and, oh yeah, the movies

I'm currently at the prestigious, if pretentious, Cannes Film Festival which runs for 10 days in a tiny town on the French Riviera. This year's movie lineup has been its most extravagant in years, from Cannes favorites like Terrence Malick, Lars von Trier, Pedro Almodóvar and Woody Allen peppered throughout the week.

Review: ‘Inside Job’

Two years removed from the big financial collapse of 2008, documentarian Charles Ferguson answers the question “How did it all start?” Ferguson takes the grand task upon himself and interviews seemingly every CEO, economics professor and financial advisor in the Tri-State area. His result is a sleek, sexy and surprisingly fun exposé - “Inside Job” reveals the inner-workings of Wall Street and the financial sector.

Review: ‘Let Me In’

Based on the modern Swedish classic “Let The Right One In,” “Let Me In” is Hollywood’s response to vampire-mania, following in the footsteps of “Twilight” and “True Blood.”

Review: ‘The Town’

Ben Affleck now finds himself both in front of and behind the camera in "The Town," his second directorial attempt after the 2007 critically acclaimed "Gone Baby Gone."
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