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On New Year’s resolutions

When your dog sticks to them better than you do

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I’m not sure about everyone else, but I’m really struggling to wrap my head around it being 2019. Whether it is misdating my notes to be a year off or being surprised every time someone says the year aloud, 2019 just doesn’t seem to feel right quite yet. Having said this, I am trying to start the year off as a new me. On Dec. 31, as my sister and I sat down for our Harry Potter marathon leading up to midnight with an iced tea and popcorn in hand, I created a list of New Year’s resolutions that I felt would ensure 2019 to be the year of happiness, health and success. First on the list was to stop eating junk food and consuming sugary drinks so often.

Food-related goals aside, I started off the first week well — going to the gym, getting more sleep and trying to meditate before starting my day. Then school started, and things became more complicated. This week I overslept after staying up too late watching Ellen on YouTube and had to rush to my first class of the day. I forgot about scheduling class discussions, which directly overlapped with the time I wanted to go to the gym. To compensate, I also forgot my computer charger, backpack and keys when going to class, but I burned calories taking three extra trips to my room and back outside. Needless to say, New Year’s resolutions have been a bit of a challenge for me this year.

On the other hand, my service dog, Libby, seems to be taking the transition into 2019 like a champ. Unlike me, she did not need to make any resolutions because of the incredible discipline she has had since the day I met her. While I am furiously getting ready in the morning, Libby is calmly lying on her bed waiting for her morning breakfast. When Libby goes outside to exercise, her tail is constantly wagging. While I am trying to stay awake in class or finish up an assignment at night, Libby is taking every moment she can to rest.

I have come to realize that Libby is sticking by my New Year’s resolutions better than I am so far, which is a concerning thought, but fingers crossed that there is still hope for me in the coming 12 months. I will keep my spirits up that, with such a great example by my side, good habits are bound to rub off on me. And if not, I guess there is always next year to add becoming more like my dog to my resolution list.

 

Contact Trisha Kulkarni at trishak8 ‘at’ stanford.edu.