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‘Rhythms’ brings multicultural arts to the public
A performance from a past show. (Courtesy of Stanford Sanskriti)

‘Rhythms’ brings multicultural arts to the public

Held annually on Family Weekend, Rhythms is a multicultural benefit show that features a wide variety of student group performances. The show features both traditional and modern renditions of cultural dance, a cappella and other talents.

The event is hosted by Sanskriti, Stanford’s undergrad South Asian organization. Sruthi Raguveer ‘20, co-president of Sanskriti, worked to produce the show with her colleagues.

“I’m co-president of Sanskriti this year, and that led to me being quite involved with Rhythms,” Raguveer mentioned. Raguveer spent much of her time “organizing, getting teams to perform and just generally getting the event together.”

This year, the two-and-a-half hour show highlighted 16 different student groups including Akasma Bellydance, Mua Lac Hong and Stanford Jump Rope. The show drew hundreds of students, family and members of the general public.

Vickie Wang ‘19, a member of O-Tone, Stanford’s East Asian a cappella group, reflected on performing in Rhythms: “O-Tone is only a two-year-old group, so it was incredible to be able to perform at Rhythms for the first time this year. I think Rhythms is amazing in that it’s able to bring together people from all over campus, as well as visiting families and members of the community, and showcases the rich diversity and passion of Stanford students — and all for a great cause.”

Ticket proceeds went to Makkala Jagriti, an NGO located in India whose primary initiative is to teach girls from underprivileged areas self-defense. This year, Makkala Jagriti was selected based on a member of Sanskriti’s previous personal involvement, according to Raguveer.

Rhythms will undoubtedly be back in 2019. “In the few meetings we’ve had since Rhythms, we’ve tried to brainstorm ways we could improve upon it in the future. One problem we’ve had in the past is not having much continuity between years  … one of my hopes going forward is that we make the process for Rhythms much smoother.”

 

Contact Elizabeth Gerson at egerson ‘at’ stanford.edu.