Support independent, student-run journalism.

Your support helps give staff members from all backgrounds the opportunity to conduct meaningful reporting on important issues at Stanford. All contributions are tax-deductible.

Outside Lands 2015: Sunday – DMA’s, St. Paul and The Broken Bones, GIVERS, Sky Ferreira and more

By

Music Festival Observation #1: The music gets louder as the day goes on.

Music Festival Observation #2: Most food stalls and food trucks are out to get you.

Music Festival Observation #3: The bathrooms by the media tent have the shortest line.

Onward to the music.

Hailing from Newtown, Australia, DMA’s debuted this year with an EP and has already established a cult following. Like a lot of the new bands at Outside Lands, they haven’t gotten much press yet, so even trivial tasks like figuring out the band member’s names is difficult. If you’re like me and have a soft spot for indie British rock bands, you should check out DMA’s even though they aren’t British. “Delete” is their most popular song, but I like “Your Low.”

DMA's lead singer Tommy O'Dell. O'Dell's singing style is often compared to that of Liam Gallagher from Oasis. RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
DMA’s lead singer Tommy O’Dell. O’Dell’s singing style is often compared to that of Liam Gallagher from Oasis. (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)
Well adjusted sunglasses are a crucial part of any performance. RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
Well adjusted sunglasses are a crucial part of any performance. Matt Mason on guitar (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)
Guitarist Johnny Took of DMA's. RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily.
Guitarist Johnny Took of DMA’s. (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily.)

The next band I saw wasn’t even on the lineup. Hidden in the forest between Gastro Magic and Choco Lands, I stumbled upon Royal Jelly Jive.

They were playing in a stage sponsored by Juxtapoz Magazine, where all of the staff were in costume and made-up to resemble a cross between Captain Jack Sparrow and a circus clown. And they could play. Maybe I just appreciated that “San Francisco’s Finest Hard-Swingin’ Soul Jive” band were playing real instruments. Not a Macbook Pro in sight.

I was so impressed I even bought their CD. Now all I have to do is find a CD player…

Royal Jelly Jive. RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
Royal Jelly Jive. (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)

After the pleasant surprise that was Royal Jelly Jive, it was time for the act I had been waiting all weekend for — St. Paul and The Broken Bones.

I’ve been listening to St. Paul and The Broken Bones on my way to work for a couple weeks now. My fellow music beat editor Ben, claims that they’re recorded work doesn’t really do them justice. I think he’s right. There’s no recording that can capture the soul that frontman Paul Janeway injects into the microphone. Three songs went by way too fast.

From his music to his style, frontman Paul Janeway doesn't  seem to hold anything back.  RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
From his music to his style, frontman Paul Janeway doesn’t seem to hold anything back. (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)
St. Paul and The Broken Bones' unusual usual horn section. Usually their horn section does not have a tenor saxophone and includes Allen Branstetter on trumpet and Ben Griner on trombone. RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
St. Paul and The Broken Bones’ unusual usual horn section. Usually their horn section does not have a tenor saxophone and includes Allen Branstetter on trumpet and Ben Griner on trombone. (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)
RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
(RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)

Lead singer Taylor Guarisco of GIVERS doesn’t like standing still. GIVERS hasn’t released an album since “In Light” (2011), but it doesn’t sound any less relevant. They’re a happy band, and they play happy music that’s hard not to dance to.

RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
Givers singer and guitarist Taylor Guarisco.  (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)
Givers. RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
Guarisco and bassist Josh LeBlanc. (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)
RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
Drummer Kirby Campbell. (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)
RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
Tiffany Lamson on percussion. (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)

Benjamin Booker and his band aren’t what you would consider relaxed. Their music is hard and fast and it doesn’t let up. Booker’s raspy voice is unrelenting and always has somewhere to go. They’re a fairly young band and I can’t wait to see what they do next.

Benjamin Booker. RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
Benjamin Booker. (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)
Bassist Alex Spoto. RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
Bassist Alex Spoto. (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)
Max Norton on Drums. One of the rare times the drummer is not tucked in at the back of the stage. RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
Max Norton on drums. One of the rare times the drummer wasn’t tucked in at the back of the stage. (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)

For me, Outside Lands 2015 ended with Sky Ferreira. I’m glad it did. Her song “24 Hours” off her latest album “Night Time, My Time” was my favorite. It’s very 90s. It’s big, it’s pop, it’s electronic. Is it Sky Ferreira? You tell me.

Sky Ferreira. RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
Sky Ferreira. (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)
Sir Johnny Danger, keyboardist for Sky Ferreira. RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
Sir Johnny Danger, keyboardist for Sky Ferreira. (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)
Brad Bowers on guitar. RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily
Brad Bowers on guitar. (RAHIM ULLAH/The Stanford Daily)

That’s all folks! Really that’s all.

 

And I’m out.

 

Contact Rahim Ullah at rahimu ‘at’ stanford.edu.