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University to cancel BOSP Indiana in light of ‘religious freedom’ law

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The Stanford Bing Overland Studies Program will shut down its wildly popular Indiana Center program for spring quarter, in response to the state’s controversial new religious freedom law, University officials announced Tuesday.

The closure will force 35 students to vacate the program’s headquarters in Fort Wayne and another 10 to leave its satellite office in Muncie. Officials apologized for the inconvenience but said they had taken a necessary step to support the LGBT community, which critics of the law say could now face legal discrimination in the state.

“Stanford is joining a long list of organizations standing up for human rights in Indiana,” said Ramon Saldivar, the BOSP director. “We especially wish to thank men’s basketball coach Johnny Dawkins, who courageously and presciently decided several weeks ago to boycott the Final Four in Indianapolis.”

Saldivar added that all of the displaced students will be rehoused in the Stanford in Flint or Stanford in Wichita programs.

Editor’s note: This article was published as part of The Daily’s April Fool’s Day edition and is completely fictitious. All attributions in this article are not genuine and this story should be read in the context of pure entertainment only.