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Fashion Spotlight: the trials and tribulations of trends

Trends: a very controversial topic. What is so appealing about them, anyway? Although they’re intended to be lighthearted and fun, they don’t always end up that way. To some, they may seem like little fashion challenges that one can play around with, but that’s not always the case. This week, I want to address common critiques of trends.

Trends, like camouflage print scarfs, are a fun way to revitalize your look. (RENJIE WONG/The Stanford Daily)

Trends, like camouflage print scarfs, are a fun way to revitalize your look. (RENJIE WONG/The Stanford Daily)

Trends inevitably convey a very strong message. When coming from elite fashion magazines, they can imply, “You have to be this thin, or this tall, or this skin tone to be able to pull off this look.” But how is that real if we all are different shapes and sizes? This is definitely something worth thinking about.

Some may say that this is not the case at all. Although trends are portrayed in a very specific manner in fashion magazines, part of the fun is taking that as an inspiration and, in turn, doing whatever you want from there. Let’s pretend that the biggest trend right now is the crop top. For example: although that crop top might not work on me the same way as the model, I can think about playing around with different waistlines and silhouettes created by my clothing. It’s true that it’s not exactly the same, but who said we all need to take those magazines so seriously anyway?

But there’s always the haute couture fashionista who will say that trends are <@WeideItal>very<@$p> particular. And that’s partly true: A crop top is a crop top, and there’s not really any other way to make something that’s not a crop top a crop top. And if I feel like I can’t pull off a crop top, I’m excluded from the latest and greatest fashion trend of the moment. It makes me not “fashionable” enough for haute couture that season.

This makes fashion sound really exclusive. But trust me, it’s not. Fashion is all about self-expression, and the way we view it really makes all the difference. There are no “rules” in fashion<\p><\_><\p>only opinions. You really can wear whatever you want, whenever you want. At least here in the United States, no one’s going to punish you for what’s on your body. So take a risk. The trends are there for your inspiration, but in reality the world is your oyster when it comes to deciding what style you want to adopt. If you don’t like the current trends, start your own trends! Even if they don’t become universally popular, you’ll look like the best version of yourself that you could imagine, and that’s something beautiful.

So even though I’ll be forecasting trends in the upcoming weeks, don’t feel tied down to them. They’re simply suggestions for how to change your image if you’re feeling festive or daring in the fashion world. Take them as a challenge and a one-of-a-kind way to express yourself.