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79-77 is your final from Provo after a furious comeback falls barely short at the end. Card get No. 9 Texas in Austin next. Tough draw.: 2 days ago, Stanford Daily Sport
Card looked sloppy and lost at times, but this team's resiliency is really something else. Just won't go away easily.: 2 days ago, Stanford Daily Sport
Stanford and Randle got the looks that they wanted at the end, and the shots just didn't fall. That happens, not much you can do about that.: 2 days ago, Stanford Daily Sport
Card get the ball back down 79-77 with 4.8 to go, and Randle misses the buzzer-beater. BYU wins by that final score.: 2 days ago, Stanford Daily Sport
Randle misses the long 3 on a clean look. Stanford will get the ball back with a chance.: 2 days ago, Stanford Daily Sport
Travel. Stanford down 2, gets the ball back and can kill the clock.: 2 days ago, Stanford Daily Sport
Randle with the clutch 3! We have a two-point game, 79-77 with just under a minute to go. ESPNU. Don't miss this ending.: 2 days ago, Stanford Daily Sport
Two forced turnovers later, it's back to a 77-72 game. Stanford doing whatever it can to stick around.: 2 days ago, Stanford Daily Sport
Stanford playing sloppy ball, BYU playing clean, foul-free ball on the other end. It's 72-59 Cougars, who have opened it up with 5 to play.: 2 days ago, Stanford Daily Sport

Grad student surprises in marathon win

Stanford astrophysics student Keith Bechtol won this year’s San Francisco Marathon on Sunday with a time of 2:23:28.

Bechtol has been running for 11 years, and after taking a three-year break from the sport’s competitive side as an undergraduate student at William and Mary, he hoped to use the marathon to see where he stood.

Bechtol would eventually stand at the finish line almost two minutes before the arrival of the next competitor, Michael Wardian from Arlington, VA., even though the 25-year-old had to balance his training with a NASA satellite project.

After preparing for only six weeks, Bechtol knew he could run at a six-minute mile pace, enough to give him a shot at doing well.

“I knew that 5:30 pace per mile would have been competitive in previous years of the San Francisco Marathon,” he wrote in an e-mail to the Daily, “So I wasn’t afraid to go out with the leaders and use their experience to my advantage.”

“I went into the day without any particular goal time in mind, but instead with a sense for how my body should feel at different stages in the race,” he added.

About Joseph Beyda

Joseph Beyda is the executive editor of The Stanford Daily. Previously he has worked as the football editor, a sports desk editor, the paper's summer managing editor and a beat reporter for football, baseball and women's soccer. He co-authored The Daily's recent football book, "Rags to Roses," and covered the soccer team's national title run for the New York Times. Joseph is a senior from Cupertino, Calif. majoring in Electrical Engineering. To contact him, please email jbeyda "at" stanford.edu.